Tracing Your Ancestors from 1066 to 1837 (Paperback)

Family History Books

By Dr Jonathan Oates
Imprint: Pen & Sword Family History
Series: Tracing your Ancestors
Pages: 142
ISBN: 9781848846098
Published: 3rd April 2012
in_stock

£12.99

Get Tracing Your Ancestors from 1066 to 1837 for just £11.04 by becoming a Platinum Member. What's this?

+£4 UK Delivery or free UK delivery if order is over £30
(click here for international delivery rates)

Order within the next 1 hour, 45 minutes to get your order processed the next working day!

Other formats available Price
Tracing Your Ancestors from 1066 to 1837 Kindle Edition (7.8 MB) Add to Basket £4.99
Tracing Your Ancestors from 1066 to 1837 ePub Edition (5.6 MB) Add to Basket £4.99


The trail that an ancestor leaves through the Victorian period and the twentieth century is relatively easy to follow – the records are plentiful, accessible and commonly used. But how do you go back further, into the centuries before the central registration of births, marriages and deaths was introduced in 1837, before the first detailed census records of 1841? How can you trace a family line back through the early modern period and perhaps into the Middle Ages? Jonathan Oates's clearly written new handbook gives you all the background knowledge you need in order to go into this engrossing area of family history research.

He starts by describing the administrative, religious and social structures in the medieval and early modern period and shows how these relate to the family historian. Then in a sequence of accessible chapters he describes the variety of sources the researcher can turn to. Church and parish records, the records of the professions and the courts, manorial and property records, tax records, early censuses, lists of loyalty, militia lists, charity records – all these can be consulted. He even includes a short guide to the best methods of reading medieval and early modern script.

Jonathan Oates's handbook is an essential introduction for anyone who is keen to take their family history research back into the more distant past.

Every family historian knows that getting back to 1837 is relatively easy, due to the introduction of civil registration in that year and of the census in 1841. But beyond 1837 is a different story. However, records are available, if you know they are and how to use them. Jonathan Oates’ new book introduces the researcher to tracing family trees back through the early modern period through the middle ages and, if you’re lucky, as far back as 1066 but guidance through administrative, legal and religious structures, church, parish, professional and court records, as well as documents pertaining to taxes, manors, property, militia and much more.

Your Family History April 2012

Tracing your ancestors through the major Victorian records can often be rewarding and even seem a doddle if your ancestors all lined up to be counted at the appropriate points of their lives.
Here Jonathan Oates’ reveals the rich array of records that were left from Medieval to Georgian times, taking the approach of a professional historian in terms of setting the context in which those records were created.
He begins by explaining that most records of this era were created by the church or the state (which were not always separate anyway), and the first chapter explains how those bodies impacted on the lives of individuals. The rest of the book looks at different categories of records in more detail. Parish records are covered, as well as those left by ecclesiastical courts, church licences, bishops’ registers, professional records and everything from apprenticeship to the early police. There are detailed explorations of both civil and criminal court records plus those from property, tax and others.

Your Family Tree, May 2012

This is one of the best books that I have encountered in Pen and Sword's popular family history series, and one that promises to be an invaluable asset to anyone tracing ancestors before the onset of civil registration.
The author achieves the delicate balance of including enough information about the institutions he discusses to give the reader a sound idea of their structure, without overwhelming his audience with facts. Each chapter is clear and empowering, providing solid suggestions about where to look for records, while also acknowledging that successful searching contains an element of luck.
Ambitious in it's scope, and with a clarity of expression and ideas, this volume is a pleasure to read and one that you are likely to return to time and again as you delve deeper into your family's past.

BBC Who Do You Think You Are Magazine

Part of Pen & Sword’s reliable ‘guides for family historians’ series, this new title fills you in on how to trace your ancestors beyond the start of civil registration in 1837. Author Jonathan Oates describes the records of use to genealogists in the medieval and early modern period to guide you even further back into the past. This is a comprehensive and easily-digestible handbook that will undoubtedly open up fascinating new avenues of research in your family history quest.

Family Tree, July 2012-07-20

This handbook is an essential introduction for anyone who is keen to take their family history research back into the more distant past.

Antiques Diary, Sept-Oct 2012

Jonathan Oates’s clearly written new handbook gives you all the background knowledge you need in order to go into this engrossing area of family history research.
Jonathan Oates’s handbook is an essential introduction for anyone who is keen to take their family history research back into the more distant past.

Kent FHS Journal

This is a clearly written book with individual chapters on specific categories of records. These include churches and parishes, courts, manorial/ property, taxes, early censuses and militia. There is a comprehensive guide to sources of information, their location and recommendations for places to visit.

Bristol & Avon FHS, September 2012

This is an essential guide that gives the background knowledge needed to trace ancestors all the way back to the Middle Ages. The author describes how the administrative, religious and social structures in the medieval and early modern periods relate to the family historian and also includes a short guide to the best methods of reading medieval scripts.

WSFHS, September 2012

The following eleven chapters cover many of the topics family historians would expect to examine once that had a need to use older and, in some cases, more difficult records, those written in Latin or with difficult handwriting, or uncatalogued or in out-of-the-way places. Dr Oates has collected many of these items into subject categories and indicates the usefulness and interest they might provide for researchers. The examples he uses to encourage new readers to explore further into the past than many might have thought possible. He includes some essential information about the whereabouts of important depositories mow which there are over a thousand spread over the country, and the final chapter gives information the record offices and libraries he has mentioned. Finally, there is some advice about reading old and difficult handwriting, a list of published official documents, and a useful index.

British Association for Local History

Easy to read and use comprehensive reference book of nearly 150 pages for family historians who have conquered the 20th and 19th centuries and want to go back further.

Essex Family Historian, December 2012

This book very clearly details all the potential areas of research which the family historian can consider when tracing ancestry back from 1937. Also described are places to visit – the record offices and libraries, as well as museums and archives. The book also includes advice on reading old handwriting and translating Latin.
Once the family researcher has experienced this book, the concerns and difficulties about how to progress further back with ancestry, are likely to be replaced by a felling of excitement and a positive relishing of the challenge in seeking family members in the annals of the past.

Genealogist’s Magazine

The examples he uses encourage new readers to explore further into the past than many might have thought possible. He includes some essential information about the whereabouts of important depositories, of which there are a thousand spread over the country, an the final chapter gives information about the record offices and libraries he has mentioned. Finally there is some advice about reading old and difficult handwriting, a list of published official documents, and a useful index.

British Association for Local History, The Local Historian

Most books focus on the easier Victorian era – here Jonathan Oates guides researchers on pushing back through the centuries.

Your Family Tree

Most books focus on the easier Victorian era – here Jonathan Oates guides researchers on pushing back through the centuries.

Your Family Tree

About Dr Jonathan Oates

Dr Jonathan Oates is the Ealing Borough Archivist and Local History Librarian, and he has written and lectured on aspects of the history of London, including its criminal past. His books include Foul Deeds and Suspicious Deaths in Ealing, Foul Deeds and Suspicious Deaths in Lewisham and Deptford, Unsolved Murders in Victorian and Edwardian London, Unsolved London Murders: The 1920s and 1930s, Unsolved London Murders: The 1940s and 1950s and Attack on London. He is also an authority on the Jacobite rebellions of 1714 and 1745 and recently published "Sweet William or The Butcher? The Duke of Cumberland and the '45".

Perfect Partner

Tracing Your Ancestors Using the Census (Paperback)

The Pen & Sword guide to the census is detailed, accessible and authoritative, and it is one of the most comprehensive on the market. It has been written with the family historian in mind, and it is packed with advice on how to explore and get the most from the census records. As well as describing the modern censuses, it provides information on the less-known censuses dating from before 1841, and it covers the records of all the constituent parts of the British Isles. It is an essential introduction and tool for anyone who is researching the life and times of an ancestor. Emma Jolly describes…

By Emma Jolly

Click here to buy both titles for £25.98
More titles by Dr Jonathan Oates

Customers who bought this title also bought...

Other titles in the series...

Other titles in Pen & Sword Family History...