Facebook Twitter Youtube Instagram Pinterest LinkedIn

Caesar’s Greatest Victory (Hardback)

The Battle of Alesia, Gaul 52 BC

Ancient History

By John Sadler, Rosie Serdiville
Imprint: Casemate UK
Pages: 320
ISBN: 9781612004051
Published: 1st October 2016

in_stock

£19.99


You'll be £19.99 closer to your next £10.00 credit when you purchase Caesar’s Greatest Victory. What's this?

+£4 UK Delivery or free UK delivery if order is over £30
(click here for international delivery rates)

Need a currency converter? Check XE.com for live rates

Order within the next 2 hours, 4 minutes to get your order processed the next working day!


The Battle for Alesia was a decisive moment in world history. It determined whether Rome would finally conquer Gaul or whether Celtic chieftain Vercingetorix would throw off the yoke and consequently whether a number of independent Celtic tribal kingdoms could resist the might of Rome. Failure would have been a total defeat for Julius Caesar, not just in Gaul but in the Senate. His career would have been over, his enemies would have pulled him down, civil war would have ensued, no dictatorship, no liaison with Cleopatra. Rome would not have become an empire beyond the Mediterranean. European, and therefore world history might have been a very different story.



Caesar’s campaign of 52 BC frequently hung in the balance. Vercingetorix was a far more formidable opponent than any encountered in Gaul; bold charismatic and imbued with strategic insight of the highest order. The Romans were caught totally off-guard and it seemed all too likely their grip on Gaul, which Caesar had imagined secure, would be prised free. The Siege of Alesia itself was one of the most astonishing military undertakings of all times. Caesar’s interior siege lines stretched for 18 kilometres and were surrounded by an outward facing line three kilometres longer, complete with palisades, towers, ditches, minefields and outposts. This work was completed in less than three weeks. Vercingetorix’s refuge proved a trap and, despite an energetic defence and the arrival of a huge relief army, there was to be no escape.



Caesar’s Greatest Victoryfully reveals both sides of the conflict, to explore in depth the personalities involved and to examine the legacy of the campaign which still resonates today. The arms, equipment, tactics and fighting styles of Roman and Celtic armies are explained, as well as the charisma and leadership of Caesar and Vercingetorix and the command and control structures of both sides. Using new evidence from archaeology, the authors construct a fresh account of not just the siege itself but also the Alesia campaign and place it into the wider context of the history of warfare. This is Roman history at its most exciting, featuring events still talked about today.

There are no reviews for this book. Register or Login now and you can be the first to post a review!

About John Sadler

John Sadler was born and bred in Northumberland and he has worked for most of his career in the law. He is an expert on medieval warfare and a prolific writer on the subject. He has made a particular study of the history of conflict between England and Scotland. His many books include Battle for Northumbria, Scottish Battles, War in the North 1461-1464, Border Fury: The Three Hundred Years War, Clan Donald's Greatest Defeat: The Battle of Harlaw 1411, Flodden 1513, The Battle for Crete 1941, Culloden 1746, Bannockburn: Battle for Liberty and The Second Barons' War: Simon de Montfort and the Battles of Lewes and Evesham.


About Rosie Serdiville

Rosie Serdiville is a writer and educator with a particular interest in radical history. She works together with John Sadler in schools and for heritage sites, often using our very different viewpoints to provide an alternative commentary on historical events. She is Vice President of the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle upon Tyne, and co-author with John Sadler of 7 military history titles.

Perfect Partner

Churchill's Spearhead The Development of Britain's Airborne Forces in WWI (Hardback)

This book covers the inception, growth and employment of Britain's airborne forces (parachute and glider-borne formations) between June 1940 and March 1945. It takes a comparative approach and follows tailored lines of development. Each of these lines - politics and policy, equipment and technology, personnel and training, command and control and concepts and doctrine - influence each other. The contents include: Politics and Policy: The political environment within which the major decisions were made concerning the concept of development of Britain's airborne forces. Churchill's personal contribution,…

By John Greenacre

Click here to buy both titles for £39.98
More titles by John Sadler

Other titles in Casemate UK...