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Maritime


Maritime history has dominated British history thanks to our island status. The Seaforth and Pen and Sword lists have some exceptional titles which have established themselves as key reference titles in the maritime and modelling worlds from the early years of seafaring, right through to the modern day.








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ShipCraft 12: Essex Class Carriers

The latest volume covers the hugely important American carrier of the Second World War. Built in larger numbers than any fleet carrier before or since, the Essex class can claim to be the US Navy's most significant weapon in the defeat of Japan. Carrying up to 100 aircraft and capable of absorbing enormous punishment (not one was sunk), they spearheaded… Read more...

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HMS Victory

HMS Victory is probably the best-known historic ship in the world. A symbol of the Royal Navy's achievements during the great age of sail, she is based in Portsmouth and seen by tens of thousands of visitors each year. As is the case for many historic ships, however, there is a surprising shortage of informative and well illustrated guides, for reference… Read more...

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British Aircraft Carriers

This book is a meticulously detailed history of British aircraft-carrying ships from the earliest experimental vessels to the Queen Elizabeth class, currently under construction and the largest ships ever built for the Royal Navy. Individual chapters cover the design and construction of each class, with full technical details, and there are extensive… Read more...

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SS Great Britain

The SS Great Britain, designed by Isambard Brunel, was the first ocean-going vessel to be screw-driven and built entirely of iron. When she was launched in 1843 she was twice the size of any previous ship and her revolutionary design heralded a complete break with traditional ship construction. As is the case for many historic ships, however, there… Read more...

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British Destroyers

In the late nineteenth century the advent of the modern torpedo woke the Royal Navy to a potent threat to its domination, not seriously challenged since Trafalgar. For the first time a relatively cheap weapon had the potential to sink the largest, and costliest exponents of sea power. Not surprisingly, Britain's traditional rivals invested heavily… Read more...

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German Naval Camouflage Vol I: 1939-41

For half a century German warship camouflage has been something of a mystery for warship enthusiasts and modelmakers. The widespread destruction of naval archives at the end of the war left little documentation, while the ad hoc application of 'unofficial' schemes in theatres like Norway led to many variegated and frequently altered patterns. This… Read more...

Special Operations: The Saint Nazaire Raid

Building on the success of various Commando Raids during 1941, Headquarters Combined Operations moved up the scale of size and complexity by electing to attack and deny the only dry dock that could take a German battleship for repairs, the Normandie Dock at St Nazaire on France's Atlantic coast. The problem was that the port was miles up an estuary… Read more...

The War of the Motor Gun Boats

Tony Chapman was born in Southampton in 1924. Aged 16 he watched with horror as the historic High Street of Southampton burnt to the ground in a firestorm caused by a heavy German bombing raid on the night of 30 November 1940. He vowed to join up and fight back. Tony joined the Navy. Within hours of being posted to his first Motor Gun Boat, Telegraphist… Read more...

Slaughter at Sea

Ironically while the Japanese Navy followed many of the Royal Navy's traditions and structures, it had a totally different approach to the treatment of its foes. The author has uncovered a plethora of outrages against both servicemen and civilians which make chilling and shocking reading. These range from the execution of POWs, the abandonment of survivors… Read more...

Royal Navy Versus the Slave Traders

On 16 March 1807, the British Parliament passed The Abolition of the Slave Trade Act. In the following year the Royal Navy's African Squadron was formed, its mission to stop and search ships at sea suspected of carrying slaves from Africa to the Americas and the Middle East. With typical thoroughness, the Royal Navy went further, and took the fight… Read more...