Facebook Twitter Youtube Instagram Pinterest LinkedIn

Captured Memories 1900-1918 (Hardback)

Across the Threshold of War

Gallipoli Jutland 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918

By Dr Peter Liddle
Imprint: Pen & Sword Military
Pages: 320
ISBN: 9781848842342
Published: 4th October 2010
Last Released: 28th September 2011

in_stock

£12.50 Print price £25.00

You save £12.50 (50%)


You'll be £12.50 closer to your next £10.00 credit when you purchase Captured Memories 1900-1918. What's this?

+£4 UK Delivery or free UK delivery if order is over £30
(click here for international delivery rates)

Need a currency converter? Check XE.com for live rates

Other formats available - Buy the Hardback and get the eBook for free! Price
Captured Memories 1900-1918 Kindle (3.5 MB) Add to Basket £4.99
Captured Memories 1900-1918 ePub (2.0 MB) Add to Basket £4.99


Peter Liddle was a pioneer in the recording of memories of personal experience in the First World War and in the social background of those who lived through those years. Later he moved into the recording of men and women for whom the Second World War was the formative experience of their lives.

In a planned two volume collection of the most outstanding interviews of the four thousand he made, he has chosen for this 1900-18 book memories which take the reader back as many as a hundred and twenty years to days in sailing ships, a Hebridean boyhood, suffragist action, pre-1914 working class life and work in the North-East of England and city life in London as well as service in the Boer War, pioneering a settlement in Manitoba, Canada, and the Army's experiments in the use of man-lifting kites, aeroplanes and balloons.

The main focus of the book is upon the First World War with the Western Front battles, the Gallipoli Campaign and the
Battle of Jutland prominently featured, but the Mesopotamian and East African fronts and women nursing under particularly unusual circumstances are represented too. Several Victoria Cross award winners and a fighter pilot ace appear as do those whose distinction was to come later in their lives like Harold Macmillan, Henry Moore, Gordon Jacob, Emanuel Shinwell, Barnes Wallis and Victor Silvester. There is even an interview with the first conscientious objector to be court-martialed and sentenced to death before commutation of the sentence.

This book is a veritable treasure trove of the past.

This book is the pure cream of the Liddle Archives and its publication provides an enjoyable anthology in its own right. Although there is no historical context or analysis here, these interviews are so good that they truly do stand on their own and I recommend Captured Memories without hesitation

Western Front Association, P. Hart

This book is a veritable treasure trove of the past.

Heritage and History

This book is a veritable treasure trove of the past. Liddle is dedicated to the preservation of the evidence of the past and has particularly enjoyed drawing together in publications and conferences the research of others in the field.

Kent Family History Society Journal

Peter Liddle is the man responsible for the highly regarded Liddle Collection at the University of Leeds' Brotherton Library, a special archive of oral testimony painstakingly gathered from 1968 which he sought to record the experiences of people prior to the First World War, within the two World Wars, and the inter-war period. Some of those featured have provided testimony concerning life as far back as 120 years ago, in an age of sailing shops and service in the Yeomanry.

This book captures the lives of many of those recorded within the period of 1900-1918, starting with Captain Jimmy Hooper's recollection of his apprenticeship in 1904 on a sailing vessel, one of eight pre-war testimonies which also feature takes of suffragettes, pit workers and crofting life in the Hebrides. The major part of the book however features 21 interviews concerning life in the First World War, covering the roles of intelligence officers, fighter pilots and submariners' experiences from the Dardanelles, part of the Gallipoli campaign.

A fascinating glimpse into the past in the words of those who were there.

Discover my Past, England and Scotland

Members may well be familiar with two earlier works by this author, "Men of Gallipoli" and "Gallipoli 1915 - Pens, Pencils and Cameras at War". "Captured Memories" is similar, extracts from recorded interviews held in the Liddle Collection, Brotherton Library, the University of Leeds.

The first part is of memories in the days a century ago, but the main part is taken by those from the First World War ranging from the Western Front to Gallipoli. From an airship designer to a front line nurse in Belgium, concluding with a Grenadier Guards Officer in France, one Harold Macmillan.

David Saunders MBE

Several famous names are the subject of interviews in this collection, including Harold Macmillan, Henry Moore and Barnes Wallis. Yet their are contributions have been carefully selected for their wartime experiences, rather than for their celebrity status. This collection is a vindication of the clear value of oral history. Liddle allows his interviewees to speak for themselves, a technique which gives their testimony particular power. Short introductory notes are provided by the author, which give an insight into his particular recollections of the interviews. This book comes highly recommended for all readers with a keen interest in the social history of the early 20th Century. It will be particularly useful for teachers and lecturers, as it provides a vast amount of exceptional source material for this hugely important period in British history, not only military, but also political and social history.

Military Times

When we read the personal stories of those people who had the misfortune to be involved in that appalling conflict we expect to be moved. In this respect Captured Memories does not fail.
It is through his work and foresight that they are now available to everyone.

Britain at War

Peter Liddle is a pioneer in the use of oral history and 'Captures Memories' represents some of the most insightful interviews he has conducted.

Several famous names are the subject of interviews in this collection, including Harold Macmillan, Henry Moore, and Barnes Wallis. Yet their contributions have been carefully selected for their wartime experiences, rather than for their celebrity status.

The strength of this collection lies in the breath of the experiences contained within the various case studies.

This collection is a vindication of the clear value of oral history. Liddle allows his interviewees to speak for themselves, a technique which gives their testimony particular power. Short introductory notes are provided by the author, which give an insight into his particular recollections of the interviews.

This book comes high;y recommended for all readers with a keen interest in the social history of the early 20th century. It will be particularly useful for teachers and lecturers, a it provides a vast amount of exceptional source material for this hugely important period in British history, not only military, but also political and social history.

Jonathan Eaton

This collection is a vindication of the clear value of oral history. Liddle allows his clear interviewees to speak for themselves, a technique which gives their testimony particular power.
This books comes highly recommend for all readers with a keen interest in the social history of the early 20th century. It will be particularly useful for teachers as lecturers, as it provides a vast amount to exceptional source material for this hugely important period in British history, not only military, but also political and social history.
The second volume of this collection will be eagerly anticipated.

Military Times

Having conducted over 4,000 interviews relating to key military events of the 20th century, Liddle has a veritable treasure trove of oral history sharp end of martial life. This selection focuses on the first two decades of tumultuous century and, although some of his interviewees have been rather long long in tooth and short on detail it is priceless to have such material saved.

Scottish Field

Peter Liddle is the founder of two archives for the World Wars held by the University of Leeds. They represent 40 years of work to record people's memories of war and the social context around it.

'Captured Memories' is intended to be a two-volume work, providing a distillation of the most significant of the 4,000 interviews that Liddle has conducted.
Liddle successfully balances a mixture of accounts from the war itself and the Home Front, featuring very different kinds of people.

We meet everyone from a middle class business man in London, who later became the first conscientious objector to be sentenced to dead in WW1 (thankfully it wasn't carried out), to a hebridean crofter.
The impression one gets is that he somehow remembers everyone of those 4,000 interviews.

This is an interesting selection from a unique archive, and the second volume is to be eagerly anticipated.

Your Family Tree

Few Wearsiders can lay claim to having the ear of such notables as Prime Minister Harold Macmillan, sculptor Henry Moore or bouncing bomb inventor Barnes Wallis.
But as a pioneer in the recording of memories of First World War survivors, historian and former university lecturer Peter Liddle has talked to them all- and thousands more besides. Now a selection of those 4,000 plus interviews including the charmingly quirky Victorian childhood tales of Monkwearmouth born Nellie Elsdon as been included in the new book.
As the author of several books on the first and second word wars, he continues to collect personal testimonies too - with an interview with a German solider lined up later this month.
Memories of the 'Hungry Thirties' and Second World War are planned for the next installment of 'Captured Memories' and Peter, who now lives in Yorkshire, added: "It is my hope for those who read it, the book will give pleasure as well as insight into the past".

Sunderland Echo

As the begetter and long-time curator of the Liddle Collection of archives
at Leeds, the author is well qualifies to edit this amazing selection of
letters and narratives, penned initially by men and women drawn from the
widest possible sections of society. Those taken from the first decade of
the 20th century give the reader a fascinating taste of social history - a
world in which working class girls had little choice but to 'go into
service' and their menfolk to earn their bread by dint of manual labour.
This could be extremely tough; an apprenticeship under sail, life in the
early Royal Flying Corps, emigration to Canada following active service in
South Africa . To illustrate the experiences of all levels of society from
1914 the author has interviewed veterans as well as using their letters and
memories, to create an unforgettable impression of the British nation in
that cataclysmic was - the very watershed of our national history.
The sheer variety of these accounts is staggering. Here is Gordon Jacob the
musician and composer, forming orchestras in German prison camps; Victor
Silvester the future doyen of ballroom dance; Henry Moore the sculptor, as a
young rifleman; Nurse Elsie Knocker, MM - the award handed to her by Prince
Alexander of Teck '...he gave it to me with a slap on my bottom...he was
sweet'. The book is awash with these delightful vignettes and a marvellous
primer for a now largely ignorant generation on what that war actually did
to us - and for us.

Michael Hickey

Few conflicts have evoked such powerful and evocative memories as the First World War. Much of this was because it was the first industrialised war and the first in which universal conscription meant that the battles were fought on a previously unimagined scale and in conditions which we can never truly appreciate. So when we read the personal stories of those people who had the misfortune to be involved in that appalling conflict we expect to be moved. In this respect 'Captured Memories' does not fail.
The first section of the book concerns life for people before the First World War. Consider, for example the case of the young Jimmy Hooper. Conditions at sea on a sailing ship plying the seas between Australia and the United Kingdom in 1904 were harsh. Water had to be purchased and was therefore considered expensive and crew members were placed on strict rations - one cup of tea plus lime juice to prevent scurvy per day. Food often amounted to no more than hard biscuits which had to have the weevils knocked out of them before they were consumed.
Poor food and harsh conditions was the lot of so many in those pre-war days and it is something that is perhaps overlooked in light of the more dramatic events that followed in 1914. When many men joined the Army in the First World War they at least did not have the day-to-day pressures of tying to make ends meet that were their existence in their normal civilian life.
Britain's first major conflict of the twentieth century was the Boer War and this was no pleasant experience. This war, of course, saw the introduction of concentration camps and led to bitter reprisals. One man, George Ives, explained how British troops that were captured were treated:
"Our job was to shoot Boers and they were to do the same with us. That was our job. If they captured any of us, they had no place to keep us and nothing to feed us with. So they used to take all your clothes off in the morning when the sun was up and send you off to your camp bare-footed and stripped, and the sun would burn you to pieces. Exactly that happened to one of my mates."
Many of those "captured memories" of the people interviewed were from the more affluent members of society. For them food and clothes and working conditions were simply not an issue. From these people we get memories of an entirely different nature. When serving in the First World War, they can talk about warfare from a more distant view - theirs are stories about battles and men, polo and bridge. There were some, however, though achieving high command in later years who had to learn their trade in the front line.
Air Commodore P.J. Fullard CBE, DSO, MC & Bar, AFC, fought a very personal battle in the air on the Western Front and he was quite frank about the realities of war:
"I just felt that i wanted to survive and my best way of doing it was to kill the other fellow... I can give you an example. I was on an early morning flight and I came across a two-seater and i got under his tail and shot him up properly... [then] the observer in the machine i thought i had dealt with conclusively came to life again an fairly shot me up. I had no qualms about going down again and shooting him to pieces. I mean I wasn't going to be insulted in that way, so to speak, being shot up... I got down and I shot him down and he was seen to fall in flames quite close to the lines... Oh yes, I shot him down alright; I would never dream of doing otherwise."
With its main focus on the events of the First World War, this book contains almost thirty extended interviews gathered over many years. The fighting on the Western Front, the Gallipoli Campaign and the Battle of Jutland all feature prominently in the recollections, along with the events in Mesopotamia and East Africa. Several Victoria Cross holders appear, as do those whose distinction was to come later in life. Among the latter are Harold Macmillan, Henry Moore, Barnes Walis and Victor Silvester. The author has also included an interview with the first conscientious objector to be tried - Howard Cruttenden Marten. Marten was sentenced to death, though this was subsequently commuted. He first met the author in 1973.
We are fortunate that Peter Liddle has captured these accounts, forming as they do a valuable record of an era that is, to all intents and purposes, no longer living memory. It is through his work and foresight that they are now available to everyone.

John Grehan

The strength of this collection lies in the breadth of the experiences contained within the various case studies. This collection is a vindication of the clear value of oral history. Liddle allows his interviewees to speak for themselves, a technique which gives their testimony particular power. Short introductory notes are provided by the author, which give an insight into his particular recollections of the interviews. This book comes highly recommended for all readers with a keen interest in the social history of the early 20th Century. It will be particularly useful for teachers and lecturers, as it provides a vast amount of exceptional source material for this hugely important period in British history, not only military, but also political and social history.

Military Times

Captured Memories is intended to be a two-volume work providing a distillation of the most significant of the 4,000 interviews that Liddle has conducted. This is the first and covers WWI, divided into two sections - the build up and duration of the conflict.
Liddle's interesting introduction provides a suitable account of the importance of oral history. He successsfully balances a mixture of accounts from the war itself and the Home Front, featuring very different kinds of people. There are some famous names, however, this book isn't about names so much as experiences. In each case, Liddle lets his interviewees take centre stage, but his short and affectionate backgrounds are often interesting and help provide background to people's lives. The impression one gets is that he somehow remembers every one of those 4,000 interviews.
This is an interesting selection from a unique archive, and the second volume is to be eagerly anticipated.

Your Family Tree

Having conducted over 4,000 interviews relating to key military events of the 20th century, Liddle has a veritable treasure trove of oral history at his disposal, often told by those at the sharp end of martial life. This selection focuses on the first two decades of the tumultuous century and, although some of his interviewees may have been rather long in the tooth and short on detail, it is priceless to have such material saved.

Scottish Field

In this, the first of a planned two volume collection (the 2nd, logically, will cover the period of World War II) Peter Liddle has conducted thousands of interviews with men and women who recorded their memories of personal experiences at the time of the First World War, in what Liddle himself describes as a 'veritable treasure trove' of the past. The resulting collection of the most outstanding of these interviews provides fascinating personal insight into social life both before and during the war. For it should be noted that this is not just an account of the war period itself; the dates titled are clue enough as to this and therefore what we as a reader are taken back to are vivid accounts from pre-1914, such as sailing ship experiences, the life of a pit boy, and memories of both working class and middle class life. Of course, the period of the war itself is then given much more prominence, with particular focus on memories of the Western Front battles and the Gallipoli campaign. Even so, Liddle has gained a wide spectrum of accounts, not just from front line soldiers across the globe but from intelligence officers, pilots, submarine commanders, and even from nurses whose stories are indeed no less compelling than those who were in battle. Perhaps most interestingly the author provides extracts from an interview with Howard Marten, a conscientious objector who faced the very real threat of the death sentence for his actions and opinions. Liddle's work here is painstaking, with interviews spanning many years, and this collection is testament to each individual's efforts during that period, whatever faction they may have been in, and each account is individually chaptered with Liddle seemingly allowing a person's memories to be retold verbatim, with minimal interjection from himself.

Carl (customer review)

Peter Liddle has made it his mission in life to capture an oral history of the World War eras. He is determined that the human experience of such extraordinary times won’t be lost forever when events finally slip from living human memory, so has spent the last few decades conducting thousands of interviews with survivors all over the globe. This book concentrates on the memories and personal experiences of those living their working lives in the first two decades of the twentieth century, bringing this era vividly to life in a way that historical facts and figures never can. These enchanting and moving interviews provide precious insight into a time with which many of us may feel familiar, from old black and white war films and the like, but which, as these vignettes show, is a much different world to the one we live in now and the one we might imagine it to have been. Whilst many books exist which drily chronicle the key historical events of that time, this instead concentrates on the personal experiences of individual people living through them; their day-to-day lives, thoughts and emotions. It is a wonderfully evocative device for lifting the lid on the past, and we hear from a diverse range of people - those involved in the frontline suffragette movement, Victoria Cross winners, battlefield nurses and even the first conscientious objector sentenced to death. A compelling read for all and an important historical record of the real people caught up in tumultuous times.

Lisa
Dr Peter Liddle

About Dr Peter Liddle

Former teacher, lecturer and founder/director of two archives on the world wars of the twentieth century, Peter Liddle is a well-published historian of personal experience in those wars with books on
Gallipoli, The Somme and D-Day. He is dedicated to the preservation of the evidence of the past and has particularly enjoyed drawing together in publications and conferences the research of others in the field..

He has a lifetime of interest in sport, history travel and wildlife. He lives with his wife, Louise, in Rawdon, Leeds. He is Life President of The Second World War Experience Centre.

More titles by Dr Peter Liddle

Customers who bought this title also bought...

Other titles in Pen & Sword Military...