Tag: maritime Page 1 of 2

Author Guest Post: David Craddock

The starting point for this book was my own experience as a young cadet with P&O in the early 1960s. During bridge watches at night, and often during the day, it was quite routine to call up passing ships with the Aldis signal lamp and I remember the 3rd Officer during the First Watch (8-12) one night asking me to ‘call up that ship’. “What do I say?” I ask him. “Start with ‘What Ship, Where Bound?’” came the reply. And so I did, almost certainly with some first-time nerves; sending Morse by lamp is easy but reading it takes practice and I cannot recall with clarity what the outcome was, but the opening question has stayed with me and eventually became the title of this book.

Read More

Author Guest Post: Vyvyen Brendon

Jane Austen and Brothers at Sea

Jane Austen’s life and work often sprang into my mind while I was writing Children at Sea. I imagined the black violinist Joseph Emidy playing at occasions like the Mansfield Park or Netherfield balls; I pictured Midshipman Othnel Mawdesley setting off from a parsonage similar to Steventon, leaving behind two unmarried sisters resembling Jane and Cassandra; and I compared William and Charles Barlow’s naval feats with those of her fictional seamen and her own brothers. I even came to suspect that William Barlow crept into the last novel in the shape of a dissolute minor character.

Read More

Author Guest Post: Vyvyen Brendon

Children at Sea: Lives Shaped by the Waves

by Vyvyen Brendon

On the Road in Fact and Fiction

Read More

Author Guest Post: Vyvyen Brendon

Black Lives Matter

In preparation for a recent book-signing at the Falcon Hotel in Bude I thought back over my own connection with Cornwall and also the links between Children at Sea and the Delectable Duchy. In the course of this further research I made an interesting discovery about one of the eight seafarers whose stories I tell.

Read More

Children at Sea: Lives Shaped by the Waves by Vyvyen Brendon

During the six years I spent on this book I never ceased to enjoy delving into the evidence of lives shaped by early sea voyages. In March 2020 the pandemic shut down all the wonderful libraries, record offices, museums and art galleries I visited but I hope that researchers like me will soon be able to view their rich collections again, guided by their dedicated volunteer and professional staff. Here are some glimpses of the delights such investigations gave me.

Read More

Children at Sea: Lives Shaped by the Waves by Vyvyen Brendon

I decided to present my subject not as a general history but rather as a collection of life stories set in Georgian and Victorian times, illustrated here with pictures not used in the book. My eight characters all embarked on sea journeys as children and were never the same again. I had five criteria for selecting them.

Read More

Children at Sea: Lives Shaped by the Waves by Vyvyen Brendon

I had five reasons for wanting to write this book.

1. The photograph shows me, my brother and my cousin beside the sea in Devon where I spent my childhood. Just across the bay is Budleigh Salterton, where Millais painted the picture I chose for my cover. The Boyhood of Raleigh shows Walter and his brother captivated by a sailor’s tales of maritime adventures.

Read More

Guest Post: Michael Ford – Hunting the Last Great Pirate

A bit of background as to why I wrote the book

My maternal grandfather, Alexander Kinsey, was one of thirteen children born and raised in a large house in the leafy London suburb of Merton in the 1890s. Around that time, his father – my great grandfather – was a civil engineer by profession and accepted a post to advise on the expansion of the Port of Durban, South Africa. With his wife and brood of children they set sail for the lengthy sea voyage to Durban.

Read More

Author Guest Post: Michael Pearson – The Ohio & Malta

MALTA

George Cross Island

Sleeping or waking Malta is always in my thoughts’, so said Admiral Lord Nelson during the Napoleonic Wars. With the rise of the Nazis in 1930’s Germany, and the increasing prospect that Europe would again plummet into war, Malta was once more destined to become vital to Allied interests.

Read More

Sea Battles That Changed the World – Phil Carradice

Almost everyone knows about the great land battles of history – Hastings, Waterloo, Stalingrad, Gettysburg and so on. But strangely – and perhaps disconcertingly for a sea faring nation – not many British people know much about the important sea battles of history. They are battles that did literally change the world.

One of the earliest but most significant was the Battle of Salamis which took place in 480BC. Victory for the Athenian Navy prevented the Persian fleet of King Xerxes linking up with his formidable army – already victorious in the Pass of Thermopylae – to form an unbreakable force that would have conquered Greece and then marched on into Europe. If that had happened European history, culture and lifestyles would be very different from the way they appear today.

Read More

Page 1 of 2

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén