Tag: military history Page 1 of 3

The Battle of Cambrai: 27th November

With November being the month of Remembrance, we all consider those who went before us and the sacrifices they made. 27th November is always particularly poignant for me as it is the date my great uncle, George Hewitt was killed during the Battle of Cambrai.

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Author Guest Post: Colin Higgs

Empty Sky was never meant to be a book. But then none of the more than 130+ interviews we have conducted so far were ever intended for books; they were all filmed for TV programmes.

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Introducing Codebreaker Girls by Jan Slimming

“What would it be like to keep a secret for fifty years? Never telling your parents, your children, or even your husband?”

Codebreaker Girls: A Secret Life at Bletchley Park tells the true story of Daisy Lawrence. Following extensive research, the author uses snippets of information, unpublished photographs and her own recollections to describe scenes from her mother’s poor, but happy, upbringing in London, and the disruptions caused by the outbreak of the Second World War to a young woman in the prime of her life.

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New Release: Empty Sky

One moment the sky would be full of aircraft wheeling and positioning for the best shot at the enemy; a sky full of danger and menace. The next instant there would just be a clear blue empty sky with the sun shining down on a calm and beautiful landscape. Such was the phenomenon experienced by pilots who fought in the key battles of France and Britain in the Summer of 1940.

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Air Marshal Sir Keith Park: An Introduction

Air Chief Marshal Sir Keith Park is one of New Zealand’s greatest military leaders. Murray Rowland’s thoughtful biography, Air Marshal Sir Keith Park, will introduce a new generation of readers to an outstanding commander who played an absolutely central role in winning the Battle of Britain in 1940.

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Author video: Kate Werran

Historian Kate Werran lays bare a hushed-up ugly incident in Allied relations during WW2 when friction between black and white GIs stationed in the Cornish town of Launceston flared up into an armed uprising which led to a hasty court martial, lingering resentment and sharply divided loyalties. Here she talks about, and reads from, her book An American Uprising, and describes her lifelong attachment to Cornwall.

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Guest Post: Geoff Simpson

The first edition of Men of the Battle of Britain by Kenneth G Wynn was published by Gliddon Books in 1989. It was quickly established as a standard work of reference, though, as a senior RAF officer stressed to me recently, it is considerably more than that. A supplementary volume followed in 1992 and a second edition appeared from CCB in 1999.

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Guest Post: Janet Dubé

There was a war on 80 years ago when my parents married, and like many couples, they couldn’t live together. My father, Bernard Harris, was an army bandsman on combat training with his regiment, ready to be posted abroad. Over the summer of 1940, they spent time camped out on Newmarket racecourse.

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Author Guest Post: Bryn Evans

The Most Destructive Weapon

Seventy five years ago in 1945, on 2 May in Italy then two days later on 4 May in Germany, all Axis forces surrendered. In those campaigns the hard won air supremacy of the Allies made a crucial and decisive difference. A weapon first used in North Africa, and little recognised outside of battlefield tactics at that time, made a revolutionary impact in the defeat of the Axis armies.

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Author Guest Post: Bryn Evans

So I wanna be a paperback writer’

When the Beatles released ‘Paperback Writer’ in May 1966, another No 1 chart hit for the ‘Fab Four’, teenager Bryn Evans wondered if he could become a writer. The Beatles’ hit song would stay with him, and over the years it symbolised a tantalising goal, to be a paperback writer.

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