Introducing: The Military Legacy Series

Every town and city in the UK has been touched by war at some stage in its past and every instance has left its mark. Our Military Legacy series looks at the entirety of a town’s past, from the Romans (or before) to the present day. It will take readers through the impact of invasions and conquests, look at the price the town had to pay for battles and wars, local and foreign, discuss noteworthy military, naval and aviation figures both past and present, and pay tribute to lives lost. Naturally, some of these aspects will have had a greater impact or have made a larger contribution to the development of the town than others, and so each book will be a unique read.

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The Korean War and the Commonwealth Dimension

Hello! Today we have a guest post to share with you by author James Goulty. Eyewitness Korea by James Goulty is out now: Eyewitness Korea

Today the Korean War 1950-1953 is largely remembered as an American affair. There is good reason for this, not least the fact that America led the UN coalition that fought the Communists, and suffered around 37,000 dead, and over 100,000 wounded, many seriously. American involvement in Korea has also been enshrined in popular culture, notably via the M*A*S*H television series and films, based around the activities of a Mobile Army Surgical Hospital. Yet, over 145,000 troops from the UK, Canada, Australia and New Zealand served in Korea, together with a small number of South African soldiers attached to Commonwealth units, and non-combatant personnel from an Indian Army medical unit. Total British casualties have been officially determined as 1,078 dead and 2,674 wounded. This article will summarise the role played by British and Commonwealth ground troops during the Korean War, and their counterparts involved in the war at sea and in the air.

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An Author Pic With A Difference

Here’s Martin Pegler author of ‘Sniping in the Great War’ with the same 1916 rifle as depicted on the book jacket! Pretty cool right?

 

Military snipers are highly trained marksmen who target individual enemy soldiers. They are regarded as vital specialists in modern warfare, and their role evolved throughout the Great War. As Martin Pegler shows in this wide-ranging, authoritative study, the technique of sniping adapted rapidly to the conditions of static warfare that prevailed through much of the conflict. His account follows the development of sniping from the early battles of 1914, through the trench fighting and the attritional offensives of the middle years, to the renewed open warfare of 1918. He concentrates on the continuous British and German sniping war on the Western Front, but he also looks at how snipers operated in other theatres, at Gallipoli and Salonika and on the Eastern Front. Sniper training, fieldcraft and counter-sniping measures are described in detail. There is a full reference section giving the specification of the sniping rifles of the period and assessing their effectiveness in combat. Also featured are vivid memoirs and eyewitness accounts that offer a fascinating insight into the lethal skill of Great War snipers and their deadly trade.

Sniping in the Great War is OUT NOW with 20% off the RRP: https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Sniping-in-the-Great-War-Paperback/p/13326