Pen and Sword Books: Anniversaries

Anniversaries
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January
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Pepy's Memoires of the Royal Navy 1690
Pepy's Memoires of the Royal Navy 1690
J.D Davies, Samuel Pepys
£19.99
1st January 1690
Samuel Pepys begins his diary
Samuel Pepys was an English naval administrator and Member of Parliament, who is now most famous for the diary he kept for a decade while still a relatively young man. Although Pepys had no maritime experience, he rose by patronage, hard work and his talent for administration, to be the Chief Secretary to the Admiralty under both King Charles II and subsequently King James II.
 
Decisive Battle of the English Civil War
Decisive Battle of the English Civil War
Malcolm Wanklyn
£19.99
4th January 1642
Charles I sends soldiers to arrest members of Parliament
Charles entered the House of Commons with an armed force on 4 January 1642, but found that his opponents had already escaped, with exception to Oliver Cromwell who had not fled the house, but avoided arrest. He asked the Speaker, William Lenthall, where the MPs had fled, and Lenthall famously replied, "May it please your Majesty, I have neither eyes to see nor tongue to speak in this place but as the House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here."
 
Unconditional Surrender
Unconditional Surrender
The Memoir of the Last Days of the Third Reich and the Donitz Administration
Walter Ludde-Neurath, Jürgen Rohwer
£19.99
6th January 1981
Funeral of Karl Dönitz
Karl Dönitz was a German naval commander during WWII. In January 1943, Dönitz achieved the rank of Grand Admiral and replaced Grand Admiral Erich Raeder as Commander-in-Chief of the German Navy.  
 
On 30 April 1945, after the death of Adolf Hitler and in accordance with Hitler's last will and testament, Dönitz was named Hitler's successor as Head of State and Supreme Commander of the Armed Forces. He was the last President of the Third Reich. 
 
He died of a heart attack on Christmas Eve 1980, aged 89.
 
Gallipoli
Gallipoli
Nigel Steel
£8.50
was £12.99
8th January 1916
Allies retreat from Gallipoli
The Gallipoli Peninsula, which guards the opening to the Sea of Marmara, became the scene of heavy bloodshed when Allied forces first attacked Turkish forts there in February 1915. 
 
British and French battleships proved superior to Turkish land-based artillery, but naval mines decimated the Allied fleet, forcing a land battle that, over the course of nearly a full year, resulted in 250,000 Allied casualties. Roughly an equal number of Turks were killed or wounded.
 
Street Without Joy
Street Without Joy
The French Debacle in Indochina
Bernard Fall
£14.99
13th January 1951
First Indochina War: The Battle of Vinh Yen begins
The Battle of Vinh Yen was a major engagement in the First Indochina War between the French Union and the Viet Minh. The French Union forces inflicted a decisive defeat on the Viet Minh forces. The victory marked a turn in the tide of the war, which was previously characterized by a number of Viet Minh victories.
 
Ivan the Terrible
Ivan the Terrible
A Military History
Alexander Filjushkin
£25.00
16th January 1547
Ivan "The Terrible" crowned Tsar at age 16
Ivan IV oversaw numerous changes in the transition of Russia from a mere local medieval nation state to a small empire and emerging regional power, becoming the first Tsar of a new more powerful nation, acknowledged as "Tsar of All Russia" from 1547.
 
Cassino
Cassino
Lt Col. Ian Blackwell
£9.99
17th January 1944
Battle of Monte Cassino
The world famous monastery at Monte Cassino was a key strongpoint on the Nazis'Gustav Line blocking the Allied advance on Rome. From January to March 1944 there were four distinct battles for Cassino which was fiercely defended by German elite forces. Troops from USA, Britain, Poland, Canada, France and India were all thrown into the fray with appalling loss of life.
 
The Gestapo
The Gestapo
A History of Horror
Jacques Delarue
£19.99
20th January 1942
Wannsee Conference
Held in the Berlin suburb of Wannsee on 20 January 1942, the purpose of the conference was to inform heads of German Government Departments that had responsibility for various policies relating to Jews of Reinhard Heydrich's appointment as the sole executor of the "Final solution to the Jewish question", and to obtain their agreement to subordinate their policies to him.
 
Anzio
Anzio
Italy 1944
Lt Col. Ian Blackwell
£12.99
22nd January 1944
Operation Shingle Launched (WWII)
In an attempt to outflank the German Gustav Line running across Italy, Operation Shingle was launched on January 22nd 1944. Achieving complete surprise, the Allies made a successful landing at Anzio, but paused rather than pushing quickly inland, a delay which gave the Germans time to seal off the area and to counterattack the beachhead...
 
Winston Churchill
Winston Churchill
Nigel Blundell
£12.99
24th January 1965
Winston Churchill dies
Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill is known chiefly for his leadership of the United Kingdom during World War Two. He served as Prime Minister from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. A noted statesman and orator, Churchill was also an officer in the British Army, a historian, writer and artist. 
 
He died on 24th January 1965, 70 years to the day after his father's death.
 
The Complete Victoria Cross
The Complete Victoria Cross
A Full Chronological Record of all Holders of Britain's Highest Award of Gallantry
Kevin Brazier
£25.00
29th January 1856
Queen Victoria institutes the Victoria Cross
The VC was introduced on 29th January 1856 by Queen Victoria to reward acts of valour during the Crimean War. Since then, the medal has been awarded 1,356 times to 1,353 individual recipients. 
 
To date, only 13 medals, nine to members of the British Army, and four to the Australian Army have been awarded since the Second World War.
 
February
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The Organisation of War Under Edward III
The Organisation of War Under Edward III
H J Hewitt
£10.99
1st February 1327
Coronation of Edward III
Edward III was one of the most successful English monarchs of the Middle Ages. Restoring royal authority after the disastrous reign of his father, Edward II, he went on to transform the Kingdom of England into the most efficient military power in Europe.
 
Napoleon's Polish Gamble
Napoleon's Polish Gamble
Eylau & Friedland 1807
Christopher Summerville
£16.99
7th February 1807
Napoleonic Wars: Battle of Eylau
French forces fight an inconclusive battle against Russian and Prussian forces in Eastern Prussia. 
 
Christopher Summerville's gripping account of this bitterly fought clash and of Napoleon's subsequent triumph at Friedland is the first extensive study of the campaign to be published for a century.
 
Wavell
Wavell
Soldier & Statesman
Victoria Schofield
£30.00
9th February 1941
WWII: End of Operation Compass
Commanded by General Wavell, Operation Compass was the first major Allied military operation of the Western Desert Campaign during World War II. British and Commonwealth forces attacked Italian forces in western Egypt and eastern Libya in December 1940 to February 1941. The attack was a complete success. Allied forces advanced from inside Egypt to central Libya, captured 115,000 Italian prisoners, and destroyed thousands of tanks, artillery pieces, and aeroplanes, while suffering very few casualties.
 
The Grand Fleet
The Grand Fleet
Warship Design and Development 1906-1922
D K Brown
£19.99
10th February 1906
HMS Dreadnought (1906) launched
HMS Dreadnought was a battleship of the British Royal Navy that revolutionised naval power. Her entry into service in 1906 represented such a marked advance in naval technology that her name came to be associated with an entire generation of battleships, the "dreadnoughts", as well as the class of ships named after her, while the generation of ships she made obsolete became known as "pre-dreadnoughts". She was the sixth ship of that name in the Royal Navy.
 
Dresden and the Heavy Bombers
Dresden and the Heavy Bombers
Frank Musgrove
£16.99
13th February 1945
Dresden devastated
Hundreds of bombers launch a massive Allied air raid against the city of Dresden, Germany. Over a three-day period, 3,900 tons of explosives and incendiaries were dropped by 1,300 British and American aircraft, reducing much of the city to smoldering rubble and killing between 35,000 and 135,000 civilians. 
 
Dresden had been famous for its historic buildings and artwork until it became the victim of the most destructive air raid of the World War II.
 
Disaster At Kasserine
Disaster At Kasserine
Charles Whiting
£19.95
14th February 1943
Battle of the Kasserine Pass
German General Erwin Rommel and the Afrika Korps launch an offensive against the Allies in Tunisia. 
 
Those who imagined that the arrival of a major American force in North Africa would immediately tip the balance against Rommel's Africa Korps were to be proved badly wrong...
 
Singapore's Dunkirk
Singapore's Dunkirk
Geoffrey Brooke D.S.C RN
£19.95
15th February 1942
Singapore falls to Japan
In one of the greatest defeats in British military history, Britain's supposedly impregnable Singapore fortress surrenders to Japanese forces. Singapore, located off the Malay Peninsula was considered invulnerable to attack because of its big defensive guns. However, the weapons, which used armor-piercing shells and the flat trajectories necessary to decimate an enemy fleet, were not designed to defend against a land attack on the unfortified northern end of the island.
 
Battle of Britain 1917
Battle of Britain 1917
Diane Canwell, Jon Sutherland
£19.99
17th February 1918
German WWI Bomber bombs St Pancras
As fighter aircraft improved in WWI, the great gas-filled Zeppelins prove too vulnerable to undertake bombing raids. In their place both sides developed heavy bombers during the second half of the war, and by 1918 these were quite formidable craft. On February 17 of that year one of London's railway stations, St Pancras, was bombed by a Staaken R.VI (with a wingspan nearly equaling that of the WWII Boeing B-29) carrying a crew of seven and a bomb load of 4000 pounds.  
 
Read more: http://www.historyworld.net/wrldhis/PlainTextHistories.asp?ParagraphID=qby#ixzz1ED4UvOcz 

 
Under Fire In The Dardanelles
Under Fire In The Dardanelles
Camilla Cecil, Kira Charatan
£15.99
was £19.99
19th February 1915
Dardanelles
The First World War: British and French forces begin the bombardment of Turkish positions in the Dardanelles. 
 
Winston Churchill's obsession with the Dardanelles had fatal consequences for many thousands of servicemen. Moreover it almost destroyed the career of the most influential British figure of this Century. Penn's latest work examines in depth an extraordinary and ill-matched politico/military relationship which was to have the most far-reaching results.
 
Walking Verdun
Walking Verdun
A Guide to the Battlefield
Christina Holstein
£10.39
was £12.99
21st February 1916
The Battle of Verdun
The Battle of Verdun, which lasted from 21 February to 15 December 1916, was a turning point in the First World War and Fort Douaumont was the heart of the battle. Situated at 395 metres above sea level, Fort Douaumont was in 1914 the strongest and most modern of the forts around Verdun. It formed the keystone to the French defence around the city andits possession allowed for unrivalled observation over the whole sector.
 
Hitler and Nazism
Hitler and Nazism
Enzo Colletti
£11.99
24th February 1920
Nazi Party is founded
The National Socialist German Workers' Party, commonly known in English as the Nazi Party (from the German Nazi, abbreviated from the pronunciation of Nationalsozialist), was a political party in Germany between 1919 and 1945. It was known as the German Workers' Party (DAP) prior to a change of name in 1920. 
 
The party's last leader, Adolf Hitler, was appointed Chancellor of Germany by president Paul von Hindenburg in 1933. Hitler rapidly established a totalitarian regime known as the Third Reich.
 
The Escape From Elba
The Escape From Elba
Norman Mackenzie
£14.99
26th February 1815
Napoleon escapes from Elba
The Escape From Elba tells the heroic story of Napoleon's exile and phoenix-like return. In this classic account, now republished in paperback, Norman MacKenzie chronicles this extraordinary year: the tense last hours of Napoleon's empire, his humiliating exile, his midnight escape and his whirlwind march over snowbound mountains to Grenoble where, in a dramatic confrontation with the French army, he became a reigning prince again.
 
Ladysmith
Ladysmith
The Siege
Lewis Childs
£9.95
28th February 1900
Siege of Ladysmith Lifted
During the Second Boer War, the 118-day Siege of Ladysmith is lifted. 
 
In 1899 the Boers, armed with the latest European rifles and artillery, drove through Natal to help themselves to a seaport - Durban - only to spend their energies in laying siege to the market and railway town of Ladysmith.
 
March
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Profiles of Flight - Lockheed F-104 startfighter
Profiles of Flight - Lockheed F-104 startfighter
Interceptor/Strike/Reconnaissance Fighter
£19.99
4th March 1954
First Flight of the Lockheed F-104 Starfighter
The Starfighter was once described as ‘a delight to fly, but one mistake and it will kill you’. It is one of the world’s fastest fighters with a top speed of Mach 2.2 and a service ceiling of 58,000 feet. First delivered to the USAF in 1958 it was also sold to the German, Greek, Italian, Turkish and Italian Air Forces. It could carry a variety of air to air and air to surface missiles and was powered by a single General Electric J79 turbojet that developed 17,900 lb of thrust with afterburner. The Italian Air Force continued to fly it into the 21st Century.
 
Ultimate Spitfires
Ultimate Spitfires
Peter Caygill
£19.99
5th March 1936
First flight of the Supermarine Spitfire
The Supermarine Spitfire, the only British fighter to be manufactured before, during and after the Second World War, was designed as a short-range fighter capable of defending Britain from bomber attack and achieved legendary status fulfilling this role during the Battle of Britain.According to fighter ace J.E. "Johnnie" Johnson it was the best conventional defensive fighter of the war.
 
Mutiny and Insurgency in India 1857-58
Mutiny and Insurgency in India 1857-58
The British Army in a Bloody Civil War
Dr T A Heathcote
£19.99
6th March 1857
Indian Mutiny within the British Army
The events of 1857 to 1859 were tragic and momentous. The challenge to British colonial rule was on an unprecedented scale. Initially a mutiny by local troops, the conflict spread to involve local princes, rulers and land-owners. The fighting was widespread and involved horrific acts of brutality by both sides as well as great courage. In modern parlance, war crimes, crimes against humanity and ethnic cleansing were common-place.
 
The Rhine Crossing
The Rhine Crossing
Andrew Rawson
£12.99
7th March 1945
Americans find intact bridge over Rhine
In a major coup for the Allied war effort, U.S. Army forces reach the Rhine River at the small German town of Remagen, and find the Ludendorff Bridge still standing. Nazi leader Adolf Hitler planned on using the Rhine as a formidable natural obstacle against the advancing Allied troops, and ordered all bridges across the river destroyed. German troops were preparing to blow up the Ludendorff Bridge when American forces captured it on March 7 under heavy fire.
 
Burma - The Turning Point
Burma - The Turning Point
Major-General Ian Lyall Grant
£19.95
8th March 1944
The Battle of Imphal
The Battle of Imphal took place in the region around the city of Imphal, the capital of the state of Manipur in North-East India from March until July 1944. Japanese armies attempted to destroy the Allied forces at Imphal and invade India, but were driven back into Burma with heavy losses. Together with the simultaneous Battle of Kohima on the road by which the encircled Allied forces at Imphal were relieved, the battle was the turning point of the Burma Campaign, part of the South-East Asian Theatre of World War II. Many historians consider it to be the biggest Japanese defeat of the war.
 
Death of a Gunfighter
Death of a Gunfighter
The Quest for Jack Slade, the West's Most Elusive Legend
Dan Rottenberg
£14.99
10th March 1864
Legendary Gunslinger Jack Slade killed by vigilantes
Jack Slade, a former soldier and teamster, was hired to clean up the line’s most dangerous division. Slade kept the stagecoaches running and helped launch the Pony Express, securing California and its gold for the Union and earning the nickname “The Law West of Kearny.”  
 
But once Slade had restored the peace, his life descended into alcoholism, transforming him from a courageous leader and devoted husband into a quick-triggered drunk, who finally lost his life at the hands of vigilantes in March 1864.
 
Yorkshire's Flying Pickets
Yorkshire's Flying Pickets
Brian Elliott
£12.99
12th March 1984
Miners strike over threatened pit closures
More than half the country's 187,000 mineworkers went on strike following the announcement by Chairman of the Coal Board Ian MacGregor 20 uneconomic pits would have to close, putting 20,000 miners out of work.
 
Warlords of Republican Rome
Warlords of Republican Rome
Caesar Versus Pompey
Dr Nic Fields
£15.99
was £19.99
15th March 44 BC
Julius Caesar is assassinated
The assassination of Julius Caesar was the result of a conspiracy by forty or so Roman senators, self-styled the Liberatores, who, led by Gaius Cassius Longinus and Marcus Junius Brutus, stabbed Julius Caesar to death in the Theatre of Pompey on the Ides of March (March 15) 44 B.C.
 
Remagen Bridge
Remagen Bridge
Andrew Rawson
£9.95
17th March 1945
Remagen Bridge collapses
The Ludendorff Bridge in Remagen, Germany collapses, ten days after its capture. 
 
The Bridge at Remagen was famously siezed by the American forces in a daring coup-de-main operation which, due to German blunder and oversight, remained intact.
 
Baghdad or Bust
Baghdad or Bust
Mike Ryan
£19.95
20th March 2003
Start of Iraq War
The Iraq War, also known as The Second Gulf War, Operation Iraqi Freedom or Operation New Dawn, is an ongoing military campaign which began on March 20th 2003, with the invasion of Iraq by a multinational force led by troops from the United States and the United Kingdom.
 
The Kaiser's Battle
The Kaiser's Battle
Martin Middlebrook
£16.99
21st March 1918
WWI Spring Offensive - The Kaiser's Battle
At 9.30am on 21st March 1918, the last great battle of the First World War commenced when three German armies struck a massive blow against the weak divisions of the British Third and Fifth Armies. It was the first day of what the Germans called the Kaiserschlacht ('the Kaiser's Battle'), the series of attacks that were intended to break the deadlock on the Western Front, knock the British Army out of the war, and finally bring victory to Germany. In the event the actual cost of the gamble was so heavy that once the assault faltered, it remained for the Allies to push the exhausted German armies back and the War was at last over.
 
Germany's Last Mission to Japan:
Germany's Last Mission to Japan:
The Sinister Voyage of "U-234"
Joseph Mark Scalia
£32.99
25th March 1945
WWII: Final voyage of German Submarine U-234
German submarine U-234 was a Type XB U-boat of the German Kriegsmarine during World War II. Her first and only mission into enemy territory consisted of the attempted delivery of uranium and other German advanced weapons technology to the Empire of Japan. After learning of Germany's unconditional surrender, the submarine surrendered to the United States on 14 May 1945.
 
Wakefield & Towton
Wakefield & Towton
War of the Roses
Phil Haigh
£9.95
29th March 1461
Battle of Towton
The Battle of Towton in Yorkshire during the War of the Roses. More than 28,000 are killed. Henry VI's Lancastrian forces are beaten and the throne is claimed by Edward IV.
 
Scott of the Antarctic
Scott of the Antarctic
We Shall Die Like Gentlemen
Sue Blackhall
£19.99
29th March 1912
Captain Scott perished in the Antarctic
Captain Scott and his four comrades all perished from a combination of exhaustion, starvation and extreme cold during the ill-fated Terra Nova Expedition.
 
Britain's Most Notorious Hangmen
Britain's Most Notorious Hangmen
Stephen Wade
£19.99
30th March 1905
Birth of Albert Pierrepoint
Albert Pierrepoint is the most famous member of the family which provided three of the United Kingdom's official hangmen in the first half of the 20th century. He was Britain’s most prolific executioner, carrying out up to 600 executions between 1932 and 1956, which included 202 German war criminals and numerous infamous public figures such as Derek Bentley, John George Haigh, Timothy John Evans and Ruth Ellis.
 
April
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Victory in the Falklands
Victory in the Falklands
Nick Van der Bijl
£19.99
2nd April 1982
Argentina invades Falklands
The Falkland Islands, a British possession for 149 years, are invaded by Argentina on this day. The British have long claimed the Falklands, based on their discovery by British navigator John Davis in 1592, but they have also been claimed and occupied at various times by Spain, France, and Argentina. For several decades, Argentina petitioned the United Nations for possession of the Falkland Islands, but Britain refused to comply, leading Argentine dictator General Leopoldo Galtieri to order a full-scale invasion.
 
Burma - The Turning Point
Burma - The Turning Point
Major-General Ian Lyall Grant
£19.95
4th April 1944
WWII: Battle of Kohima
The Battle of Kohima was the turning point of the Japanese offensive into India in 1944. The battle was fought from 4th April to 22nd June around the town of Kohima in northeast India, and is often referred to as the "Stalingrad of the East".
 
The Battle of the Lys 1918
The Battle of the Lys 1918
Givenchy and the River Lawe
Phil Tomaselli
£12.99
7th April 1918
WWI: Battle of Lys
The battle opened on the evening of 7 April, with a heavy German artillery barrage against the southern part of the Allied line (between Armentières and Festubert.) The barrage continued until dawn on 9 April.  
 
The Sixth Army then attacked with eight divisions. The centre of the attack struck the Portuguese divisions, which crumbled. The British 55th Division (south of the Portuguese) pulled back its northern brigade, and despite numerous further attacks held its ground for the rest of the battle. The British 40th Division (to the north) was outflanked and attacked from the rear and fell back to the north. 
 
Horne committed his emergency reserves to stem the German breakthrough, but they too were defeated. The Germans broke through 15 km of front and advanced up to 8 km, the most advanced probe reaching Estaires on the Lys. There they were finally halted by British reserve divisions.
 
Edward IV and the Wars of the Roses
Edward IV and the Wars of the Roses
David Santiuste
£19.99
9th April 1483
Edward IV dies, aged 40
Edward IV died on 9 April 1483, aged 40, and is buried in St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle. He was succeeded by his twelve-year-old son, Edward V of England. 
 
It is not known what actually caused Edward's death. Pneumonia and typhoid have both been conjectured, as well as poison. Some attributed his death to an unhealthy lifestyle, as he had become stout and inactive in the years before his death.
 
Death in the Doldrums
Death in the Doldrums
U Cruisers Off West Africa
Bernard Edwards
£19.99
10th April 1944
German submarine U-68 sunk
German submarine U-68 was a Type IXC U-boat of the German Kriegsmarine that operated during World War II. U-68 was one of the most successful boats, succeeding in sinking over 197,000 tons of allied shipping in 10 patrols, a career lasting more than three years. 
 
On the 10th April 1944 she was sunk by depth charges and rockets from Avenger and Wildcat aircraft of the US escort carrier Guadalcanal.
 
Reported Missing
Reported Missing
Lost Airmen of the Second World War
Roy Conyers Nesbit
£19.99
12th April 1944
WWII: Wing Commander Adrian "Warby" Warburton went missing
Adrian Warburton was a Royal Air Force (RAF) pilot during World War II. He became legendary in the RAF for his role in the defence of Malta. His gallantry was recognised by the award of the Distinguished Service Order and Bar, the Distinguished Flying Cross and two Bars and an American Distinguished Flying Cross. 
 
Warburton was the pilot of one of two Lockheed P-38 F-5B reconnaissance aircraft that took off from Mount Farm on the morning of 12th April 1944 to photograph targets in Germany. After the pair separate he failed to arrive at the rendezvous point and was not seen again. Years of speculation about his fate came to an end in 2002, when his remains were found in the cockpit of his plane.
 
Barnet -1471
Barnet -1471
Death of a Kingmaker
David Clark
£12.99
14th April 1471
Battle of Barnet
The Battle of Barnet was a decisive engagement in the Wars of the Roses. Along with the subsequent Battle of Tewkesbury, the battle secured the throne for Edward IV and the house of York.
 
Awards of the George Cross
Awards of the George Cross
1940-2009
John Frayn Turner
£6.00
was £12.99
15th April 1942
The George Cross is awarded to Malta
The George Cross was awarded to the island of Malta by King George VI in a letter dated 15 April 1942 to the island's Governor Lieutenant-General Sir William Dobbie, so as to "bear witness to the heroism and devotion of its people" during the great siege it underwent in the early parts of World War II.  
 
The George Cross is woven into the Flag of Malta and can be seen wherever the flag is flown.
 
Launch Pad UK: Britain & the Cuban Missile Crisis
Launch Pad UK: Britain & the Cuban Missile Crisis
Jim Wilson OBE
£19.99
17th April 1961
Bay of Pigs Invasion
An army of 1,400 anti-Castro Cuban exiles who have been secretly recruited, trained, and funded by the United States invade their homeland at Bahia de Cochinos--the Bay of Pigs. American President John F. Kennedy, disturbed by Fidel Castro's two-year-old communist regime in Cuba, approved the invasion but at the last minute refused to order air support when it became apparent that the operation was doomed to failure. Within three days, the invasion force, abandoned by Kennedy and the American military, was forced to surrender to the communists.
 
The Red Baron
The Red Baron
Manfred Von Richthofen
£12.99
20th April 1918
WWI: The Red Baron shoots down his 79th and 80th victims
Manfred von Richthofen, aka The Red Baron, shoots down his 79th and 80th victims marking his final victories before his death the following day. 
 
Manfred von Richthofen was the most successful flying ace during World War I, being officially credited with 80 confirmed air combat victories. He served in the Imperial German Army Air Service.
 
The Red Baron DVD DVD
The Red Baron DVD
The True Story of Manfred Von Richthofen
History Films
£15.99
was £19.99
21st April 1918
WWI: Red Baron shot down and killed
World War I German fighter ace Manfred von Richthofen, known as "The Red Baron", is shot down and killed over aux-sur-Somme in France.
 
Zeebrugge & Ostend Raids
Zeebrugge & Ostend Raids
Stephen McGreal
£10.39
was £12.99
23rd April 1918
Zeebrugge Raids
World War I: The British Navy, commanded by Admiral Keyes, raids the German submarine base at Zeebrugge.
 
Tank Action in the Great War
Tank Action in the Great War
B Battalion's Experiences 1917
Ian Verrinder
£15.99
was £19.99
24th April 1918
First tank-to-tank combat
On 24th April 1918 the first ever tank-to-tank combat occurred at Villers-Bretonneux, France, when three British Mark IVs met three German A7Vs.
 
Anzac-The Landing
Anzac-The Landing
Gallipoli
Stephen J Chambers
£14.99
25th April 1915
Gallipoli Landings
World War I: Australian, New Zealand, British and French forces begin landing on the Gallipoli Peninsular to attack Turkish positions.
 
The Gestapo
The Gestapo
A History of Horror
Jacques Delarue
£19.99
26th April 1933
Gestapo is established
The official secret police force of Nazi Germany; the Gestapo was given the job of investigating and combatting 'all tendencies dangerous to the state'.  
 
They were given the power to imprison without judicial proceedings, often in concentration camps. It was also responsible for destroying any opposition to Hitler.
 
Auschwitz Death Camp
Auschwitz Death Camp
Rare Photographs from Wartime Archives
Ian Baxter
£14.99
27th April 1940
Himmler orders construction of Auschwitz
SS Reichsführer Heinrich Himmler orders the construction of a concentration camp in Oswiecim, Poland.  
 
Known as Auschwitz in German, the facility will play a central role in the Nazi plan to exterminate Europe's Jews.
 
Fred Dibnah
Fred Dibnah
A Tribute
Keith Langston
£25.00
28th April 1938
Fred Dibnah was born
Fred Dibnah MBE, born in Bolton, was a famous steeplejack and engineer, aswell as TV personality and steam enthusiast. 
 
When presenting his own programmes, his blunt, no nonsense style made a welcome change from the so called television professionals. His genius lay in being able to communicate with the audience in simple, direct, colloquial English. 
 
Dibnah died on 6 November 2004 aged 66, following a three-year battle with prostate cancer.
 
In Pursuit of Hitler
In Pursuit of Hitler
Andrew Rawson
£19.99
29th April 1945
Dachau liberated
On April 29, 1945, American forces liberate Dachau, the first concentration camp established by Germany's Nazi regime. Established just five weeks after Adolf Hitler took power as chancellor in 1933, the camp was situated on the outskirts of the town of Dachau, just 12 miles north of Munich. Dachau became the model for other Nazi concentration camps and was also the first to use prisoners as human guinea pigs in medical experiments. At Dachau, Nazi scientists tested the effects of freezing and changes to atmospheric pressure on inmates, infected them with malaria and treated them with experimental drugs, and forced them to drink only seawater, among other savage experiments. Some 40,000 inmates died at Dachau and countless more passed through on their way to the death camps in Poland, where millions perished.
 
May
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Enemies of the State
Enemies of the State
The Cato Street Conspiracy
M J Trow
£19.99
1st May 1820
Cato Street conspirators executed
On 1st May 1820, outside Newgate Prison in front of a dense crowd, five of the Cato Street conspirators - Arthur Thistlewood, William Davidson, James Ings, Richard Tidd and John Brunt - were hanged for high treason. Then they were decapitated in the last brutal act of a murderous conspiracy that aimed to assassinate Prime Minister Lord Liverpool and his cabinet and destroy his government.
 
The Field Campaigns of Alexander the Great
The Field Campaigns of Alexander the Great
Stephen English
£19.99
1st May 333 BC
Battle of Issus
The Battle of Issus occurred in southern Anatolia, in November 333 BC. The invading troops, led by the young Alexander of Macedonia, defeated the army personally led by Darius III of Achaemenid Persia in the second great battle for primacy in Asia. After Alexander's forces successfully forced a crossing of the Hellespont and defeated the Persian satraps led by a Greek mercenary in a prior encounter, Darius took personal charge of his army, gathered a large army from the depths of the empire, and maneuvered to cut the Macedonian line of supply, requiring Alexander to countermarch his forces, setting the stage for the battle near the mouth of the Pinarus River and south of the village of Issus.
 
The New Cunard Queens
The New Cunard Queens
Queen Mary 2, Queen Victoria and Queen Elizabeth
Nils Schwerdtner
£19.99
2nd May 1967
Maiden voyage of RMS Queen Elizabeth 2
RMS Queen Elizabeth 2, often referred to simply as the 'QE2', is a former Cunard ocean liner. She was named after the earlier Cunard liner RMS Queen Elizabeth and served as the flagship of the line from 1969 until succeeded by RMS Queen Mary 2 in 2004.  
 
Built in Clydebank, Scotland, she was considered the last of the great transatlantic ocean liners built for over four decades before the construction of the QM2.
 
Tewkesbury
Tewkesbury
Eclipse of the House Of Lancaster - 1471
Steven J Goodchild
£10.99
4th May 1471
Battle of Tewkesbury
On 4 May 1471 the forces of Lancaster under the Duke of Somerset and those of York under Edward IV clashed at Tewkesbury in Gloucestershire in one of the decisive battles of the Wars of the Roses.
 
Bare Feet & Bandoliers
Bare Feet & Bandoliers
Wingate, Sandford, the patriots & the Liberation of Ethiopia
David Shireff
£25.00
5th May 1941
WWII: Eithopia Liberated
On 6 April 1941, Addis Ababa was liberated by General Alan Cunningham's force. Emperor Haile Selassie made a formal entry to the city on 5 May. This was five years after being forced to flee when the Italians captured his capital on 5th May 1936 during the Second Italo-Abyssinian War.
 
VE Day  - A Day to Remember
VE Day - A Day to Remember
Craig Cabell, Frederick Forsyth, Allan Richards
£10.00
was £19.99
8th May 1945
VE Day
After five years, eight months, and five days of massive devastation, the end of the European phase of World War II is celebrated on May 8, 1945. Victory in Europe was commemorated with celebrations all around the world in recognition of the unconditional surrender of all German forces signed in Reims, France, the day before. British Prime Minister Winston Churchill told war-weary Londoners, This is your victory, while U.S. President Harry Truman reminded Americans that until Japan's defeat, Victory is but half-won.
 
The Secret Capture
The Secret Capture
U-110 and the Enigma Story
Stephen Roskill
£16.99
9th May 1941
German Submarine U-110 captured by Royal Navy
U-110 was captured by the Royal Navy on 9th May 1941 which provided a number of secret cipher documents to the British. U-110's capture, later given the code name "Operation Primrose", was one of the biggest secrets of the war, remaining secret for seven months. 
 
The documents captured from U-110 helped Bletchley Park codebreakers solve Reservehandverfahren, a reserve German hand cipher used as a backup method when no working Enigma machine was available.
 
Mutiny and Insurgency in India 1857-58
Mutiny and Insurgency in India 1857-58
The British Army in a Bloody Civil War
Dr T A Heathcote
£19.99
10th May 1857
Indian Rebellion of 1857
The events of 1857 to 1859 were tragic and momentous. The challenge to British colonial rule was on an unprecedented scale. Initially a mutiny by local troops, the conflict spread to involve local princes, rulers and land-owners. The fighting was widespread and involved horrific acts of brutality by both sides as well as great courage.
 
Berlin Airlift
Berlin Airlift
Salvation of a City
Diane Canwell, Jon Sutherland
£19.99
12th May 1949
Berlin Blockade Lifted
On this day, an early battle of the Cold War ends when the USSR lifts its blockade against West Berlin. In June 1948, in an attempt to discourage the Western powers from maintaining the sovereignty of West Berlin, the USSR imposed blockades on routes to Berlin through Soviet occupation zones in East Germany. Although land routes were blocked, the Soviets would not risk shooting down planes, and the West undertook a massive airlift of coal, food, and supplies. Flights were made around the clock, and at the height of the Berlin Airlift, planes were landing in the city every three minutes.
 
Afrika Korps
Afrika Korps
Ian Baxter
£11.99
RRP £14.99
13th May 1943
WWII: German Afrika Korps surrender to Allied forces
The Afrika Korps was derived and formed upon Adolf Hitler's personal choice of Erwin Rommel to its command.  
 
Following the defeat at El Alamein and the Allied invasion in Morocco and Algeria, The German Armed Forces High Command upgraded its presence in Africa, but by May the next year the last remnants of the Afrikakorps surrendered, along with all other remaining Axis forces in North Africa.
 
The Second Barons' War
The Second Barons' War
Simon de Monfort and the Battles of Lewes & Evesham
John Sadler
£19.99
14th May 1264
Simon de Montfort victorious at the Battle of Lewes
The Battle of Lewes was one of two main battles of the conflict known as the Second Barons' War. It took place at Lewes in Sussex, on 14 May 1264. It marked the high point of the career of Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester, and made him the "uncrowned King of England".
 
The Battle for Afghanistan
The Battle for Afghanistan
The Soviets Versus the Majahideen During the 1980s
Mark Adkin, Mohammad Yousaf
£12.99
15th May 1943
Red Army begins its withdrawal from Afghanistan
Following almost a decade of fighting, the final troop withdrawal began on May 15th 1988, and ended on February 15th 1989. Due to the interminable and inconclusive nature of the war, the conflict in Afghanistan has often been referred to as the Soviet equivalent of the United States' Vietnam War.
 
Dropping Britain's First H-Bomb
Dropping Britain's First H-Bomb
The Story of Operation Grapple 1957
Group Captain Kenneth Hubbard OBE DFC AFC, Michael Simmons
£19.99
15th May 1957
Britain dropped it's first live thermonuclear bomb
Weighing about 4,545 kg, the bomb exploded with a force of 300 kilotons, a yield far below the prediction. Despite this, Britain deemed "Operation Grapple" a success and broadcast to the world that the UK had the resolve and the capability to protect her own democracy and that of her Commonwealth.
 
Albuera 1811
Albuera 1811
The Bloodiest Battle of the Peninsular War
Guy Dempsey
£25.00
16th May 1811
Battle of Albuera
On 16 May 1811, the small town of Albuera was the setting for one of the Peninsular War's most bloody and desperate battles. A combined Spanish, British and Portuguese force of more than 30,000 men, under the command of Lord Beresford, stubbornly blocked the march of the French field marshal Soult, who was trying to reach the fortress of Badajoz, 12 miles north. Beresford, who defended himself with his bare hands against a Polish lancer, was victorious, but at the cost of 6,000 Allied deaths and 7,000 French in just four hours.
 
Cassino
Cassino
Lt Col. Ian Blackwell
£9.99
18th May 1944
Allies win the Battle of Monte Cassino
World War II: Allied troops led by the Polish Army, finally win the Battle of Monte Cassino in Italy. 
The world famous monastery at Monte Cassino was a key strongpoint on the Nazis'Gustav Line blocking the Allied advance on Rome. From January to March 1944 there were four distinct battles for Cassino which was fiercely defended by German elite forces. Troops from USA, Britain, Poland, Canada, France and India were all thrown into the fray with appalling loss of life.
 
Armada 1588
Armada 1588
John Barratt
£16.99
19th May 1588
Spanish Armada sets Sail
Spanish Armada sets sail from Lisbon in Portugal to attack England. 
The subsequent defeat of the Spanish Armada is one of the turning points in English history, and it was perhaps the defining episode in the long reigns of Elizabeth I of England and Philip II of Spain. The running battle along the Channel between the nimble English ships and the lumbering Spanish galleons has achieved almost legendary status.
 
Crete
Crete
The Airborne Invasion 1941
Major Tim Saunders
£16.99
20th May 1941
Nazis Invade Crete
World War II: German paratroopers invade the Meditteranean island of Crete - the first airborne invasion of a country ever attempted. 
The invasion was launched to round off Hitler's Balkan Campaign against Crete in May 1941. The Island was important to Britain's control of the Eastern Mediterranean and Churchill was determined that the Island would be held.
 
1809 - Thunder on the Danube - Volume I
1809 - Thunder on the Danube - Volume I
Napoleon's Defeat of the Habsburgs
John H Gill
£30.00
21st May 1809
Battle of Aspern-Essling
In the Battle of Aspern-Essling Napoleon attempted a forced crossing of the Danube near Vienna, but the French and their allies were driven back by the Austrians under Archduke Charles. The battle was the first time Napoleon had been personally defeated in over a decade.
 
The Battles of St Albans
The Battles of St Albans
Peter Burley, Michael Elliott, Harvey Watson
£14.99
22nd May 1455
First Battle of St Albans
The First Battle of St Albans was the first battle of the Wars of the Roses and was fought on 22 May 1455 in the town of St Albans. Richard, Duke of York and his ally, Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick, defeated the Lancastrians under Edmund, Duke of Somerset, who was killed. York also captured Henry VI and had himself appointed Constable of England.
 
Ramillies - 1706
Ramillies - 1706
The Year of Miracles
James Falkner
£12.99
23rd May 1706
Battle of Ramillies
On Sunday 23 May 1706, near the village of Ramillies in modern Belgium, the Anglo-Dutch army commanded by John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, inflicted a devastating defeat on the French army of the Duke de Villeroi. The French army was shattered physically and morally and, as a result, Marlborough's army overran almost all of the Spanish Netherlands in the next six weeks, and gained an unshakeable advantage over the armed might of Louis XIV's France during the long War of the Spanish Succession.
 
Dunkirk and the Fall of France
Dunkirk and the Fall of France
Geoffrey Stewart
£19.99
25th May 1940
Battle of Dunkirk
A part of the Battle of France on the Western Front, the Battle of Dunkirk was the defence and evacuation of British and allied forces in Europe.  
Lord Gort made the decision to evacuate on May 25, 1940, and the last troops departed France on June 4. 
 
Winston Churchill called the events in France "a colossal military disaster", saying that "the whole root and core and brain of the British Army" had been stranded at Dunkirk and seemed about to perish or be captured. He hailed their rescue as a "miracle of deliverance".
 
Bismarck: The Epic Chase
Bismarck: The Epic Chase
The Sinking of the German Menace
James Crossley
£19.99
26th May 1941
WWII: The Bismarck is spotted
An RAF Catalina spots the Bismarck at 1030 on 26th May. Swordfish Torpedo-bombers from the Ark Royal score hits on the Bismarck, disabling her steering gear and rendering her unmaneuverable.
 
Last Stand at Le Paradis
Last Stand at Le Paradis
The Events leading to the SS Massacre of the Norfolks 1940
Richard Lane
£19.99
27th May 1940
Le Paradis massacre
The Le Paradis massacre was a war crime committed by members of the 14th Company, SS Division Totenkopf, under the command of Hauptsturmführer Fritz Knöchlein. It took place on 27 May 1940, during the Battle of France, at a time when the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) was attempting to retreat through the Pas-de-Calais region during the Battle of Dunkirk. 
 
Soldiers of the 2nd Battalion, the Royal Norfolk Regiment, had become isolated from their regiment. They occupied and defended a farmhouse against an attack by Waffen-SS forces in the village of Le Paradis. After running out of ammunition, the defenders surrendered to the German troops. The Germans led them across the road to a wall, and machine-gunned them. Ninety-seven British troops died. Two survived, with injuries, and hid until they were captured by German forces several days later.
 
Churchill and the Norway Campaign 1940
Churchill and the Norway Campaign 1940
Graham Rhys-Jones
£19.99
28th May 1940
Allied Capture of Narvik
After the Allied failure in Central Norway, more preparation was given to the northern forces, including two squadrons of carrier-transported fighters operating from Bardufoss Air Station, one of them consisting of Hurricanes, the other of Gloster Gladiators. 
 
By 28 May, the Allies had succeeded in recapturing Narvik from German forces, but the German invasion of France and the Low Countries had immensely altered the overall situation of the war and the importance of Norway was considerably lessened. Operation Alphabet, the general Allied retreat from Norway, had been approved on 24 May and by 8 June, after destroying rail lines and port facilities, all Allied troops had been evacuated.
 
Fortune Favours The Brave
Fortune Favours The Brave
The battle of the Hook Korea 1952-53
A J Barker
£19.99
29th May 1953
Korean War: The Third Battle of the Hook ends
The third Battle of the Hook was a battle of the Korean War that took place between a United Nations force against a predominantly Chinese force. 
 
The Hook saw more blood spilt than any other feature in the Korean War.
 
The Battle of Jutland
The Battle of Jutland
Diane Canwell, Jon Sutherland
£15.99
was £19.99
31st May 1916
The Battle of Jutland
World War I: The Battle of Jutland between the British and German fleets. Germans claim victory but fail to break British control of the North Sea. 
The Battle of Jutland is said by some to be the greatest naval engagement of the First World War, if not any war.  
Admiral Scheer had adopted a policy of launching attacks against the British coast. What he did not know was that the British had broken his naval codes and that they knew of his plans.
 
June
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Battle for Crete
Battle for Crete
John Hall Spencer
£19.99
1st June 1941
Battle of Crete ends
Fighting against a constant supply of fresh enemy troops, the Allies began a series of retreats working southward across Crete. 
 
By May 31st the total occupation of Crete was a fact and the withdrawal of the majority of the ally forces to Egypt marked the end of the Battle of Crete. 
 
On June 1st, the remaining 5,000 defenders at Sphakia surrendered.
 
Midway: Dauntless Victory
Midway: Dauntless Victory
A re-examination of America's seminal naval victory of World War II.
Peter C Smith
£30.00
4th June 1942
The Battle of Midway
World War II: The Battle of Midway between American and Japanese aircraft carriers in the Pacific Ocean commences.
 
The D-Day Landings
The D-Day Landings
Philip Warner
£16.99
6th June 1944
D-day Invasion
The long-awaited Anglo-American invasion of Nazi Europe begins just after midnight on June 6, 1944, as the first wave of U.S., British, and Canadian paratroopers plunge into the darkness over Normandy. It was the largest combined sea, air, and land military operation in history, with the participation of 3 million men, 13,000 aircraft, and 6,000 ships. At daybreak, a heavy bombardment of the French coast ended as 135,000 Allied troops stormed ashore at five landing sites. Despite the formidable German coastal defenses, beachheads were achieved at all five locations.
 
Messines Ridge
Messines Ridge
Messines - Wystchaete - St Eloi
Peter Oldham
£8.00
was £10.99
7th June 1917
WWI: Battle of Messines
The Battle of Messines began on 7th June 1917 when the British Second Army under the command of General Herbert Plumer launched an offensive near the village of Mesen (Messines) in West Flanders, Belgium. The target of the offensive was a ridge running north from Messines village past Wytschaete village which created a natural stronghold southeast of Ypres. One of the key features of the battle was the detonation of 19 mines immediately prior to the infantry assault, a tactic which disrupted German defences and allowed the advancing troops to secure their objectives in rapid fashion.
 
The Battle for Norway
The Battle for Norway
April- June 1940
Geirr H Haarr
£30.00
8th June 1940
WWII: Operation Juno and sinking of HMS Glorious
Operation Juno was a German naval offensive late in the Norwegian Campaign. The mission was launched on 8 June 1940, as an attack on Harstad to relieve pressure on the German garrison at Narvik. 
 
As a notorious sideline to Operation Juno, Nazi battleships sank the British aircraft carrier HMS Glorious and her escorting destroyers.
 
London's Airports
London's Airports
Useful Information on Heathrow, Gatwick, Luton, Stansted and City
Martin Bowman, Graham Simons
£9.99
9th June 1958
Offical Opening of Gatwick Airport
Queen Elizabeth II flew into the new airport in a de Havilland Heron of the Queen's Flight to perform the opening. The first "official" flight to depart Gatwick following the opening ceremony was a BEA DC-3 operating a charterfor Surrey County Council to Jersey and Guernsey.
 
Oradour
Oradour
The Massacre & Aftermath
Philip Beck
£9.99
10th June 1944
Massacre of Oradour-sur-Glane
The destruction of the French village of Oradour and the massacre of its population in June 1944 by the SS Das Reich Division ranks as one of the most notorious atrocities of the Second World War. The scars that were left will never fully heal and there are those that would argue that they should remain as a lesson to future generations.
 
Malta
Malta
Island Under Siege
Paul Williams
£12.99
11th June 1940
The First Air Raids against Malta during WWII
On 11 June 1940, the day after Italy declared war on Britain and France, aircraft of the Italian Royal Air Force attacked Malta. Most of its land forces had been committed for the upcoming invasion of Greece, so Italy resorted to aerial bombardment. On the first day, ten Italian Cant bombers dropped bombs on Grand Harbour, Hal Far, and Kalafrana. In seven attacks, eleven civilians and six soldiers were killed. In addition, roughly 130 civilians and some soldiers were injured.
 
Falklands Hero
Falklands Hero
Ian McKay - The last VC of the 20th Century
Jon Cooksey
£19.99
12th June 1982
Para Ian McKay is killed in the Battle for Mount Longdon
At the height of the bitter battle for Mount Longdon during the Falklands War, 3rd Battalion, Parachute Regiment’s assault has stalled in the face of determined resistance. With his platoon held up by an Argentine machine gun, it falls to Sergeant Ian McKay to act. It earned him a posthumous Victoria Cross, the last of the 20th Century.
 
Air-launched Doodlebugs
Air-launched Doodlebugs
Peter JC Smith
£19.99
13th June 1944
First Doodlebug Lands in Britain
World War II: the first German V1 flying bomb, or 'doodlebug' lands in Britain - killing three people in a house in the coastal city of Southampton. 
The V 1, or 'Doodlebug' or 'Flying-bomb' came into use in June 1944 and, together with the V 2 Rocket, was Hitler's final hope in face of the advancing Allied forces sweeping across Europe towards Germany. Of the 8,000 that were launched within the first 80 days, some 2,300 reached the London area where they caused more death and destruction to its population and buildings.
 
Victory in the Falklands
Victory in the Falklands
Nick Van der Bijl
£19.99
14th June 1982
Argentinian Surrender in Falklands
Surrender of Argentinian troops by General Menendez to the British Task Force in Port Stanley following the Argentine invasion of the British-owned Falkland Islands in the South Atlantic.
 
Stoke Field
Stoke Field
The Last Battle of the Wars of the Roses
David Baldwin
£19.99
16th June 1487
Battle of Stoke
The Battle of Stoke, the last and most neglected armed clash of the Wars of the Roses, is one of history's great might-have-beens. The forces of the first Tudor king Henry VII confronted the rebel army of the pretender Lambert Simnel and his commander the Earl of Lincoln. Henry's victory over the Yorkists was decisive - it confirmed the crown to the House of Tudor for more than a century.
 
Waterloo Commanders
Waterloo Commanders
Napoleon, Wellington & Blücher
Andrew Uffindell
£19.99
18th June 1815
Napoleon defeated at Waterloo
On this day, Napoleon Bonaparte suffers defeat at the hands of the Duke of Wellington, bringing an end to the Napoleonic era of European history. Forced to abdicate as French emperor in 1814, Napoleon escaped from a brief exile on the island of Elba in 1815 to France, where he raised a new Grand Army. For the next 100 days, Napoleon, once regarded as an invincible military commander, again enjoyed success on the battlefields of Europe. However, on June 18, 1815, at the Battle of Waterloo in Belgium, he suffered his last defeat against an allied force under Wellington.
 
The First Jet Pilot
The First Jet Pilot
The Story of German Test Pilot Erich Warsitz
Lutz Warsitz
£9.99
was £19.99
20th June 1939
First flight of the first liquid-fuelled rocket aircraft
The Heinkel He 176 was a German rocket-powered aircraft. It was the world’s first aircraft to be propelled solely by a liquid-fuelled rocket, making its first powered flight on 20 June 1939 with Erich Warsitz at the controls.
 
The Red Air Force at War Barbarossa and the Retreat to Moscow
The Red Air Force at War Barbarossa and the Retreat to Moscow
Recollections of Soviet Fighter Pilots on the Eastern Front
Artem Drabkin
£15.99
was £19.99
22nd June 1941
Operation Barbarossa
Over 4.5 million troops of the Axis powers invaded the USSR along an 1,800 mile front. The planning for operation Barbarossa took several years prior to June 1941; the clandestine preparations and the military operation itself lasted almost a year, from the Spring of 1941, through the Winter of 1941.
 
Napoleon Against Russia
Napoleon Against Russia
Digby Smith
£25.00
23rd June 1812
Napoleon invades Russia
On 23rd June 1812, 500'000 men of Napoleon's army invaded Russia. Six months later barely 20,000 returned. The disastrous advance to Moscow and the subsequent retreat irreparably damaged Napoleon's military power and prestige and resulted one of the most celebrated catastrophes in all military history.
 
Bannockburn
Bannockburn
Battle for Liberty
John Sadler
£19.99
24th June 1314
Battle of Bannockburn
The Battle of Bannockburn was a significant Scottish victory in the Wars of Scottish Independence. It was the decisive battle in the First War of Scottish Independence. The bitter hostility between England and Scotland which had continued since 1296, the contrasting characters of the opposing commanders Edward II and Robert the Bruce, the strategy of the campaign and the tactics of the battle itself - all these elements combine to make the event one of absorbing and lasting interest.
 
Wingate Pasha
Wingate Pasha
The Life of General Sir Francis Reginald Wingate 1861-1953
R. J. M. Pugh
£25.00
25th June 1861
Birth of General Sir Francis Reginald Wingate
Reginald Wingate was an eminent Scottish soldier-statesman who contributed much to the development of the Sudan and Egypt during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In 1884, Wingate joined the expeditionary force to relieve Khartoum, which arrived two days too late, General Gordon having been murdered. As Kitchener’s Military Intelligence Officer, Wingate was instrumental in assisting Kitchener to recover Sudan from Dervish domination. As Governor-General of the Sudan, Wingate’s enlightened administration brought unprecedented political, social and economic prosperity to the Sudanese people. In the First World War, Wingate played a leading role in organising the Arab Revolt against the Turks, although it was his subordinate, T E Lawrence (of Arabia) who received the acclaim.
 
Edward IV and the Wars of the Roses
Edward IV and the Wars of the Roses
David Santiuste
£19.99
28th June 1461
Coronation of Edward IV
With the support of his cousin, Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick ("The Kingmaker"), Edward defeated the Lancastrians in a succession of battles during the Wars of the Roses. And whilst the Lancastrian Henry VI and his militaristic queen, Margaret of Anjou, were campaigning in the north of England, Warwick gained control of the capital and had Edward declared king in London on 28th June 1461.
 
Cherbourg
Cherbourg
Andrew Rawson
£9.99
30th June 1944
End of the Battle of Cherbourg
The Battle of Cherbourg was part of the Battle of Normandy during World War II. It was fought immediately after the successful Allied landings on 6 June 1944. American troops isolated and then captured the fortified port, considered vital to the campaign in Western Europe, in a hard-fought campaign of three weeks.
 
July
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Alamein
Alamein
Philip Warner
£19.99
1st July 1942
First Battle of El Alamein
The First Battle of El Alamein (1st-27th July 1942) was a battle of the Western Desert Campaign of World War II, fought between Axis forces commanded by Erwin Rommel, and Allied forces commanded by Claude Auchinleck. The battle halted the furthest (and final) advance made by the Axis forces into Egypt, El Alamein being only just over 50 miles from Alexandria.
 
Marston Moor
Marston Moor
English Civil War - July 1644
David Clark
£9.95
2nd July 1644
Battle of Marston Moor
Marston Moor was an extremely bitter and costly battle and a defeat for the Royalist cause during then English Civil War that had major implications for King Charles I.
 
Auchinleck
Auchinleck
The Lonley Soldier
Philip Warner
£19.99
5th July 1941
Auchinleck appointed Commander-in-Chief of Middle East Command
Field Marshal Sir Claude Auchinleck was born in India and raised in conditions of near poverty. Yet his talent ensured his career flourished despite his Indian Army background and he was the first Commander of 8th Army in North Africa. Despite great political interference, he stopped Rommel's Afrika Corps at 1st Alamein only to be sacked by Churchill.
 
The Battle for Sicily
The Battle for Sicily
Stepping Stone to Victory
Lt Col. Ian Blackwell
£19.99
9th July 1943
Operation Husky
On the night of 9-10 July 1943, an Allied armada launched the invasion of Sicily, a larger operation than the Normandy landings the following year. Over the next thirty-eight days, half a million Allied servicemen fought the Germans and Italians for control of this rocky island, which was to become the first part of Axis homeland to fall during World War II.  

 
The Battle of Britain
The Battle of Britain
John Frayn Turner
£14.99
10th July 1940
Start of Battle of Britain
The Battle of Britain was the first major campaign to be fought entirely by air forces, and was also the largest and most sustained aerial bombing campaign to that date. 
 
Beginning with Channel Battles on 10 July, the Luftwaffe moved on to attacking RAF defences, airfields and ports.
 
Battle of Kursk 1943
Battle of Kursk 1943
Hans Seidler
£14.99
12th July 1943
WWII: Battle of Prokhorovka
The Battle of Prokhorovka was fought on the Eastern Front during the Second World War as part of the Battle of Kursk in the Soviet Union. Principally, the German Wehrmacht's Fourth Panzer Army clashed with the Soviet Red Army's 5th Guards Tank Army. It is one of the largest tank battles in military history.
 
Braddock's March
Braddock's March
How the Man Sent to Seize a Continent Changed American History
Thomas E. Crocker
£19.99
13th July 1755
General Edward Braddock dies
General Edward Braddock was a British soldier and commander-in-chief for North America during the actions at the start of the French and Indian War. He is generally best remembered for his command of a disastrous expedition against the French-occupied Ohio Country in 1755, in which he lost his life. 
 
Not only did Braddock’s expedition have a profound impact on American military and political developments, this fateful march opened the first major road for westward expansion, anointed a national hero in George Washington, and sowed the seeds for the American Revolution.
 
Bomber Command 1936 - 1968
Bomber Command 1936 - 1968
Ken Delve
£19.99
14th July 1936
RAF Bomber Command formed
RAF Bomber Command was the organisation that controlled the RAF's bomber forces from 1936 to 1968.  
 
During World War II, the command destroyed a significant proportion of Nazi Germany's industries and many German cities, and in the 1960s was at the peak of its postwar power with the V bombers and a supplemental force of Canberra light bombers.  
 
RAF Bomber Command had 19 Victoria Cross winners and, in August 2006, a memorial was unveiled at Lincoln Cathedral.
 
The Road to St Helena
The Road to St Helena
Napoleon after Waterloo
J. David Markham
£15.99
was £19.99
15th July 1815
Napoleon surrenders aboard HMS Bellerophon
On 29 June the near approach of the Prussians, who had orders to seize him, dead or alive, caused him to retire westwards toward Rochefort, whence he hoped to reach the United States. The presence of blockading Royal Navy warships with orders to prevent his escape forestalled this plan. 
 
Finally, unable to remain in France or escape from it, he surrendered himself to Captain Maitland of HMS Bellerophon and was transported to England. The full restoration of Louis XVIII followed the emperor’s departure. Napoleon Bonaparte was exiled to the island of Saint Helena where he died in May 1821.
 
Stalingrad
Stalingrad
How the Red Army Triumphed
Michael K Jones
£14.99
17th July 1942
Battle of Stalingrad begins
The Battle of Stalingrad was a major battle of World War II in which Nazi Germany and its allies fought the Soviet Union for control of the city of Stalingrad (now Volgograd) in southwestern Russia. It took place between 17 July 1942 and 2 February 1943. The battle is considered by many historians to be the turning point of World War II in Europe, comparable to the way the Battle of Midway is considered to be the turning point of the Pacific War. 
 
The battle involved more participants than any other on the Eastern Front, and was marked by its brutality and disregard for military and civilian casualties by both sides. It was amongst the bloodiest in the history of warfare, with the upper estimates of combined casualties coming to nearly two million.
 
Fromelles 1916
Fromelles 1916
No Finer Courage The loss of an English Village
Michael Senior
£15.99
was £19.99
19th July 1916
WWI: Start of Battle of Fromelles
The Battle of Fromelles took place from July 19-20, 1916, during World War I. The action was intended partly as a diversion from the Battle of the Somme that was taking place about 80 kilometres (50 mi) to the south.  
 
The operation, carried out midway between the British-occupied village of Fleurbaix and that of Fromelles behind the German lines, sought to retake a salient just north of the latter, situated at about 16 kilometres (9.9 mi) from the city of Lille.
 
War For The Throne
War For The Throne
The Battle of Shrewsbury 1403
John Barratt
£19.99
21st July 1403
Battle of Shewsbury
The Battle of Shrewsbury was fought on 21st July 1403, waged between an army led by the Lancastrian King, Henry IV, and a rebel army led by Henry "Hotspur" Percy from Northumberland. 
 
Although the battle was won by King Henry, The King's forces sustained much greater losses than the rebels. The tactics and fighting methods of the day were dominated by the devastating power of the English longbow. It was noted that the King's men "fell like leaves in Autumn, every one [arrow] struck a mortal man".
 
The Hindenburg Line
The Hindenburg Line
Peter Oldham
£8.00
was £9.95
22nd July 1918
The Germans begin their retreat to the Hindenburg Line
The Hindenburg Line, or Siegfriedstellung, achieved almost mythical status in the minds of the British public: the strongest defence system the world had then seen, scientifically designed by fortification experts with only one aim, to keep at bay the British Army.
 
Operation Bluecoat-Over the Battlefield
Operation Bluecoat-Over the Battlefield
Breakout from Normandy
Ian Daglish
£25.00
30th July 1944
Operation Bluecoat
Operation Bluecoat was an attack by the British Second Army at the Battle of Normandy during World War II, from 30 July 1944 to 7 August 1944. The geographical objectives of the attack were to secure the key road junction of Vire and the high ground of Mont Pinçon. Strategically, the attack was made to support the American exploitation of their breakout on the western flank of the Normandy beachhead.
 
Passchendaele
Passchendaele
Nigel Cave
£8.00
was £9.99
31st July 1917
Passchendaele
On 31st July 1917, the small Belgian village of Passchendaele became the focus for one of the most gruelling, bloody and bizarre battles of World War I.
 
August
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Hitler's Olympics
Hitler's Olympics
The Story of the 1936 Nazi Games
Anton Rippon
£19.99
1st August 1936
Berlin Olympics
For two weeks in August 1936, Nazi Germany achieved an astonishing propaganda coup when it staged the Olympic Games in Berlin. Hiding their anti-semitism and plans for territorial expansion, the Nazis exploited the Olympic ideal, dazzling visiting spectators and journalists alike with an image of a peaceful, tolerant Germany.
 
Nelson's Battles
Nelson's Battles
Oliver Warner
£6.99
2nd August 1798
Battle of the Nile
The battle of the Nile was the climax of a naval campaign that had ranged across the Mediterranean during the previous three months, as a large French convoy sailed from Toulon to Alexandria, carrying an expeditionary force under General Napoleon Bonaparte.  
 
The French were defeated by the British forces led by Rear-Admiral Sir Horatio Nelson.
 
Pirate Hunter - The Life of Captain Woodes Rogers
Pirate Hunter - The Life of Captain Woodes Rogers
Graham A Thomas
£19.99
2nd August 1708
Captain Woodes Rogers sets sail from Bristol
On 2 August 1708 Captain Woodes Rogers set sail from Bristol with two ships, the Duke and Duchess, on an epic voyage of circumnavigation that was to make him famous. His mission was to attack, plunder and pillage Spanish ships wherever he could.
 
Kitchener's Army
Kitchener's Army
The Raising of the New Armies 1914 - 1916
Peter Simkins
£15.99
was £19.99
3rd August 1914
WWI: Germany declares war on France
When the German Empire began to mobilize on 30th July 1914, France, sporting significant animosity over the German conquest of Alsace-Lorraine during the Franco-Prussian War, ordered French mobilization on 1 August. Germany declared war on France just two days later.
 
Facing Armageddon
Facing Armageddon
Hugh Cecil, Dr Peter Liddle
£20.00
was £35.00
4th August 1914
WWI: Britain declared war on Germany
The United Kingdom declared war on Germany on the 4th August 1914, following an "unsatisfactory reply" to the British ultimatum that Belgium must be kept neutral.
 
Kitchener's Army
Kitchener's Army
The Raising of the New Armies 1914 - 1916
Peter Simkins
£15.99
was £19.99
4th August 1914
WWI: United Kingdom declare war on Germany
The United Kingdom declared war on Germany on 4th August 1914, following the invasion of neutral Belgium by Germany.
 
Sisters in Arms
Sisters in Arms
Helen Page Schrader
£19.99
5th August 1943
WWII: Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPs) Organisation created
In the US the WFTD and WAFS were combined on August 5, 1943, to create the paramilitary WASP organization. The female pilots of the WASP would end up numbering 1,074, each freeing a male pilot for combat service and duties. The WASP flew over 60 million miles in all, in every type of military aircraft. 
 
WASPs were granted veteran status in 1977, and given the Congressional Gold Medal in 2009.
 
By Hellship to Hiroshima
By Hellship to Hiroshima
Terence Kelly
£19.99
6th August 1945
WWII: Atomic Bomb dropped by the US on Hiroshima, Japan
Hiroshima was devastated when an atomic bomb ('little boy') is dropped by the US B29 'Enola Gay'.
 
The Island
The Island
A History of the First Marine Division on Guadalcanal
Herbert Laing Merillat
£10.99
7th August 1942
WWII: Guadalcanal Campaign
The Guadalcanal Campaign, also known as the Battle of Guadalcanal and codenamed Operation Watchtower by Allied forces, was fought between August 7, 1942 and February 9, 1943 on and around the island of Guadalcanal in the Pacific theatre of World War II. It was part of the Allied strategic plan to protect the convoy routes between the US, Australia and New Zealand. Launched a few months after the Kokoda Track campaign, it was the second major offensive by Allied forces against the Empire of Japan.
 
Warlords of Republican Rome
Warlords of Republican Rome
Caesar Versus Pompey
Dr Nic Fields
£15.99
was £19.99
9th August 48 BC
Caesar's civil war: Battle of Pharsalus
Although outnumbered, Julius Caesar decisively defeated Pompey at Pharsalus.  
 
Pompey fled to Egypt following the battle, but was assassinated there on the order of Pharaoh Ptolemy XIII.
 
Kitchener's Army
Kitchener's Army
The Raising of the New Armies 1914 - 1916
Peter Simkins
£15.99
was £19.99
11th August 1914
"Your King and Country Need You" slogan is published
"Your King and Country Need You" slogan is published, calling for the first 100,000 men to enlist for Kitchener's New Army. The call is answered within two weeks.
 
Churchill's Desert Rats
Churchill's Desert Rats
in North Africa, Burma, Sicily & Italy
Patrick Delaforce
£19.99
13th August 1941
WWII: Eighth Army Command given to Montgomery
With the death of Lieutenant General William 'Strafer' Gott, who was given the command of the Eight Army on 3 August, Churchill's plans to split Middle East Command into two parts is dropped and overall command given to General Sir Harold Alexander.  
 
Gott's command of the Eighth Army is given to Lieutenant General Bernard Law Montgomery.
 
Victory in the Pacific and the Far East
Victory in the Pacific and the Far East
Andrew Rawson
£12.99
14th August 1945
World War II ends
Japan agrees to surrender to the Allies. The decision, which brought an end to the most costly war in human history, came after a momentous week that saw two U.S. atomic bombs dropped on Japan and a declaration of war by the Soviets. In the evening, 1,000 Japanese army officers attacked the imperial palace with the intention of seizing a recorded message of Emperor Hirohito announcing the surrender; the imperial guards repulsed them. The next day, Hirohito's speech, which asked his people to endure the unendurable, was played on national radio, and hundreds of millions of people around the world celebrated V-J Day - Victory over Japan.
 
Operation Dragoon
Operation Dragoon
The Liberation of Southern France 1944
Anthony Tucker-Jones
£19.99
15th August 1944
WWII: Start of Operation Dragoon
Operation Dragoon was the Allied invasion of southern France on August 15, 1944, during World War II. The successfull invasion was initiated via a parachute drop by the 1st Airborne Task Force, followed by an amphibious assault by elements of the U.S. Seventh Army, followed a day later by a force made up primarily of the French First Army.
 
Lawrence of Arabia's Secret Air Force
Lawrence of Arabia's Secret Air Force
Based on the Diary of Flight Sergeant George Hynes
£19.99
16th August 1888
T. E. Lawrence is born
Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Edward Lawrence, known professionally as T. E. Lawrence, was a British Army officer renowned especially for his liaison role during the Arab Revolt against Ottoman Turkish rule of 1916–18. The extraordinary breadth and variety of his activities and associations, and his ability to describe them vividly in writing, have earned him international fame as Lawrence of Arabia.
 
The Peenemünde Raid
The Peenemünde Raid
Martin Middlebrook
£12.99
was £14.99
17th August 1943
The Peenemünde Raid
On the night of August 17th 1943, RAF Bomber Command attacked a remote research establishment on the German Baltic coast. The site was Peenemünde, where Hitler's scientists were developing both the V-1 flying bomb and the V-2 rocket whose destructive powers could have swung the course of the War.
 
Dieppe
Dieppe
Major Tim Saunders
£12.99
19th August 1942
Operation Jubilee
The Dieppe Raid, also known as Operation Jubilee, was an Allied attack during World War II on the German-occupied port of Dieppe on the northern coast of France. 
 
Over 6,000 infantrymen, predominantly Canadian, were supported by large Royal Navy and Royal Air Force contingents. The objective was to seize and hold a major port for a short period, both to prove it was possible and to gather intelligence from prisoners and captured materials while assessing the German responses. 
 
No major objectives of the raid were accomplished. A total of 3,623 of the 6,086 men who made it ashore were either killed, wounded, or captured (almost 60%). The air force failed to lure the Luftwaffe into open battle, and lost 96 aircraft.
 
Falaise
Falaise
The Flawed Victory
Anthony Tucker-Jones
£19.99
21st August 1944
Remaining German Troops in Falaise Pocket Surrender
The destruction of the trapped German forces in the Falaise pocket in August 1944 is one of the most famous episodes of the Normandy campaign. Some liken the event to Hitler's defeat at Stalingrad, while others argue the victory was flawed because so many German troops escaped.
 
Mons
Mons
The Retreat to Victory
John Terraine
£12.99
23rd August 1914
WWI: Battle Of Mons
The Battle of Mons was the first major action of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) in the First World War. The British army attempted to hold the line of the Mons-Condé Canal against the advancing German First Army.  
 
Although the British fought well and inflicted disproportionate casualties on the numerically-superior Germans, they were eventually forced to retreat due both to the greater strength of the Germans and the sudden retreat of the French Fifth Army.
 
Le Cateau
Le Cateau
Early Battles 1914
Nigel Cave, Jack Sheldon
£14.99
26th August 1914
Battle of Le Cateau
Le Cateau was the second major action fought by the BEF in the Great War. His men exhausted after fighting at Mons and by the subsequent speedy retreat, Lieutenant-General Horace Smith-Dorrien (commanding II Corps) decided that he had to make a stand in the vicinity of Le Cateau. There his men took on elements of four German corps in an action that succeeded in giving the BEF a respite, but at considerable cost.
 
The First Jet Pilot
The First Jet Pilot
The Story of German Test Pilot Erich Warsitz
Lutz Warsitz
£9.99
was £19.99
27th August 1939
First flight of the first jet aircraft
The Heinkel He 178 was the world's first aircraft to fly under turbojet power, and the first practical jet plane. It was a private venture by the German Heinkel company in accordance with director Ernst Heinkel's emphasis on developing technology for high-speed flight and first flew on 27 August 1939 piloted by Erich Warsitz.
 
Hitler's Savage Canary
Hitler's Savage Canary
A History of the Danish Resistance in World War 11
David Lampe
£19.99
28th August 1943
WWII: A general strike against the Nazi occupation is started in Denmark
With no help initially from the Allies, the Danes set up a resistance movement that proved to be a constant irritation to the occupation forces – not a meek canary, but a dangerous and courageous bird of prey that refused to be caged.  
 
The selfless courage shown by the Danes, when collaboration would have been an easy option, is astonishing.
 
The Forgotten Few
The Forgotten Few
The Polish Air Force in World War 11
Adam Zamoyski
£12.00
was £14.99
30th August 1940
Battle of Britain: Polish 303 squadron become operational
By the beginning of 1941 there was a fully fledged Polish Air Force operating alongside the RAF. With 14 Squadrons it was larger than any other of the Air Force from Nazi-occupied Europe that had joined the Allies. Over 17,000 men and women passed through the ranks of the Polish Air Force while it was stationed in the UK.
 
Jack the Ripper: Quest for a Killer
Jack the Ripper: Quest for a Killer
M J Trow
£19.99
31st August 1888
Jack the Ripper kills his 1st victim
In the early hours on the 31st August 1888 Mary Ann Nichols was murdered. She was the first of Jack the Ripper's known victims.
 
September
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Blitzkrieg Unleashed
Blitzkrieg Unleashed
The German Invasion of Poland 1939
Richard Hargreaves
£25.00
1st September 1939
Germany Invades Poland
The Invasion of Poland began at 4:40 am, with the German Luftwaffe attacking several targets in Poland. The Luftwaffe launches air attacks against Krakow, Lodz, and Warsaw. 2 Days later Neville Chamberlain announces that Britain is at War.
 
The Final Betrayal
The Final Betrayal
MacArthur and the Tragedy of Japanese POWs
Mark Felton
£19.99
2nd September 1945
WWII: Signing of Japanese Instrument of Surrender aboard USS Missouri
The Japanese Instrument of Surrender was the written agreement that enabled the Surrender of Japan, marking the end of World War II. General MacArthur, Supreme Allied Commander in the Pacific, forbade any Allied forces from liberating Japanese occupied territories before he had personally taken the formal Japanese surrender, which has been argued to have cost hundreds of British and Commonwealth POW lives.
 
Worcester 1651
Worcester 1651
Malcolm Atkin
£10.99
3rd September 1651
The Battle of Worcester
The Battle of Worcester took place on 3 September 1651 at Worcester, England and was the final battle of the English Civil War. Oliver Cromwell and the Parliamentarians defeated the Royalist, predominantly Scottish, forces of King Charles II. The 16,000 Royalist forces were overwhelmed by the 28,000 strong "New Model Army" of Cromwell.
 
A Wander Through Wartime London
A Wander Through Wartime London
Five Walks Revisiting the Blitz
Neil Bright, Clive Harris
£12.99
7th September 1940
WWII: Start of the Blitz
The sustained bombing of Britain during The Blitz hit many towns and cities across the country, beginning with the bombing of London for 76 consecutive nights from the 7th September 1940. By the end of May 1941, over 43,000 civilians, half of them in London, had been killed by bombing and more than a million houses destroyed or damaged in London alone.
 
Shot at Dawn
Shot at Dawn
Julian Putkowski, Julian Sykes
£15.99
was £25.00
8th September 1914
WWI: First British soldier executed for desertion
Private Thomas Highgate became the first British soldier to be executed for desertion during the war on 8th September 1914.
 
Salerno 1943
Salerno 1943
Angus Konstam
£19.99
9th September 1943
Operation Avalanche
The main invasion at Salerno by the United States Fifth Army began on the 9th September, and in order to secure surprise, the decision had been taken to assault without preliminary naval or aerial bombardment. However, tactical surprise was not achieved, as the naval commanders had predicted.
 
Battle of Britain
Battle of Britain
Richard Hough, Denis Richards
£16.99
15th September 1940
WWII: Victory for RAF in Battle of Britain
RAF Fighter Command is claiming victory over the Luftwaffe after a day of heavy bombing raids ended in big losses for the enemy. 
 
According to the RAF, 176 enemy aircraft were destroyed by fighter planes. At least another nine aircraft were hit by anti-aircraft guns. 
 
British casualties were much lighter - only 25 aircraft lost with 13 pilots killed or missing.
 
A Drop too Many
A Drop too Many
Major-General J Frost
£14.99
17th September 1944
The Battle of Arnhem
On 17 September 1944, Operation Market Garden - the greatest airbone assault of World War II - began. British, US and Polish airborne troops made a gallant attempt to seize and hold bridges across the Lower Rhine in Holland as a springboard for crossing into Germany. 

 
The Black Princes Expedition
The Black Princes Expedition
Kelly DeVries, H J Hewitt
£10.99
19th September 1356
Battle of Poitiers
The Battle of Poitiers was fought between the Kingdoms of England and France on 19 September 1356 near Poitiers, resulting in the second of the three great English victories of the Hundred Years' War: Crécy, Poitiers, and Agincourt. The result was a decisive French defeat, and a catastrophe for the nation. France was asked to pay a ransom equivalent to twice the country's yearly income to have the King, John II, returned.
 
The Luftwaffe in World War II
The Luftwaffe in World War II
Francis Crosby
£12.99
20th September 1939
The Luftwaffe and Britain's RAF clash for the first time
The Luftwaffe and Britain's Royal Air Force (RAF) clash for the first time, in the skies over the border between Germany and France, when German Me109s attack Fairey Battle bombers. The RAF loses two aircraft, while the Germans lose one.
 
Decisive Battle of the English Civil War
Decisive Battle of the English Civil War
Malcolm Wanklyn
£19.99
24th September 1645
Battle of Rowton Heath
The Battle of Rowton Heath took place in the vicinity of Chester, late in the English Civil War. It resulted in a decisive Parliamentarian victory over a Royalist army commanded in person by King Charles.  
 
As a result of his defeat, King Charles was prevented from relieving the besieged city of Chester, and subsequently marching north to join the Royalists in Scotland under Montrose (a move which would in any case have proved fruitless).
 
Major and Mrs Holt's Concise Illustrated Battlefield Guide - The Western Front-South
Major and Mrs Holt's Concise Illustrated Battlefield Guide - The Western Front-South
Major and Mrs Holt
£13.50
was £16.99
25th September 1915
Second Battle of Champagne
World War I Western Front: 
On the first days, the offensive was successful and the Germans lost ground. Artillery fired a heavy bombardment for 3 days and then the advance began. 2 miles were gained. The next day, reinforcements arrived for the Germans and the offensive lost momentum until it finally ended on October 6. 
 
The Germans counter attacked on October 30 and managed to reclaim all the territory lost to the French. The Plan was finally abandoned on November 6. 
 
Overall the offensive had been disastrous for the French. They had lost 145,000 Men, while the Germans lost about half that number.
 
Polygon Wood
Polygon Wood
Nigel Cave
£8.50
was £10.99
26th September 1917
Battle of Polygon Wood begins
The Battle of Polygon Wood took place during the second phase of the Third battle of Ypres in WWI, fought near Ypres in Belgium.  
 
Much of the woodland had been destroyed by the huge quantity of shellfire from both sides.
 
My Boy Jack?
My Boy Jack?
The Search for Kipling's Only Son
Major and Mrs Holt
£10.00
was £12.99
27th September 1915
John Kipling disappears during the Battle of Loos
On 27th September 1915 John Kipling, the only son of Britain's best loved poet, disappeared during the Battle of Loos. The body lay undiscovered for 77 years. Then, in a most unusual move, the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) re-marked the grave of an unknown Lieutenant of the Irish Guards, as that of John Kipling.
 
The Battlefields of England
The Battlefields of England
A H Burne
£10.00
28th September 1066
William the Conqueror invades England
The Norman conquest of England began on 28 September 1066 with the invasion of England by William the Conqueror, Duke of Normandy. They landed at Pevensey in Sussex on 28 September and erected a wooden castle at Hastings, from which they raided the surrounding area.
 
The Hindenburg Line
The Hindenburg Line
Peter Oldham
£8.00
was £9.95
29th September 1918
WWI: The Hindenburg Line is broken by Allied forces
The Hindenburg Line was a vast system of defences in northeastern France during World War I. It was constructed by the Germans during the winter of 1916-17 and stretched from Lens to beyond Verdun. 
 
The German command believed the new line was impregnable. However it was temporarily broken through during the Battle of Cambrai in 1917 and was successfully permanently breached in a number of locations during the Allied Hundred Days Offensive in September 1918. 

 
October
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Fallschirmjager: Elite German Paratroops in World War II
Fallschirmjager: Elite German Paratroops in World War II
Diane Canwell, Jon Sutherland
£14.99
1st October 1935
Fallschirmjager incorporated into Luftwaffe
Fallschirmjager are German paratroopers. During World War II they were the first to be committed in large-scale airborne operations. They came to be known as the "Green Devils" by the Allied forces they fought against.
 
Poland Betrayed
Poland Betrayed
The Nazi-Soviet Invasions of 1939
David G Williamson
£19.99
6th October 1939
WWII: The last Polish army is defeated
Hitler's attack on Poland in 1939 was the first brutal act in six years of world war, and although the Polish army was defeated in Poland by early October, 1939, a government-in-exile, an armed forces, and an intelligence service were established outside of Poland. These organisations contributed to the Allied effort throughout the whole of World War II.
 
Lifeline in Helmand: RAF Front-Line Air Supply in Afghanistan
Lifeline in Helmand: RAF Front-Line Air Supply in Afghanistan
1310 Flight in Action
Roger Annett
£30.00
7th October 2001
War in Afghanistan began
The War in Afghanistan began on October 7th 2001, as the US military's Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) was launched, along with the British military, in response to the September 11th (9/11) attacks on the US. The UK has, since 2002, led its own military operation, Operation Herrick, as part of the same war in Afghanistan.  
 
The character of the war evolved from a violent struggle against Al-Qaeda and its Taliban supporters to a complex counterinsurgency effort.
 
In Flanders Flooded Fields
In Flanders Flooded Fields
Paul Van Pul
£19.99
10th October 1914
End of the Siege of Antwerp
The German Army attacked Antwerp on September 28. Capturing many of the outre ring forts including Fort Catharine, the siege would last over a month before  
the mayor of Antwerp, Jan De Vos, offered capitulation on October the 10th. The city of Antwerp would remain occupied by German troops until 1918.
 
War, Coups & Terror
War, Coups & Terror
Pakistan's Army in Years of Turmoil
Brian Cloughley
£25.00
12th October 1999
1999 Pakistani coup d'état
On 12th October 1999, Pakistani army launched a coup, and took control of the country. The coup was led by General Pervez Musharraf, who soon after appointed himself as the Chief Executive of the country. 
 
On May 12th, 2000, Pakistan's 12 member Supreme Court unanimously validated the October 1999 coup and granted Musharraf executive and legislative authority for 3 years from the coup date, endorsing his governance.
 
Loos - Hohenzollen
Loos - Hohenzollen
Andrew Rawson
£8.00
was £9.95
13th October 1915
End of the Battle of Loos
The final attempted British offensive for Hohenzollern Redoubt fails, marking the end of the Battle of Loos.
 
U-Boats in World Wars One & Two
U-Boats in World Wars One & Two
Diane Canwell, Jon Sutherland
£12.99
14th October 1939
U-boat U-47 sinks the British battleship HMS Royal Oak
Royal Oak fell victim to the skill and audacity of U-boat ace Kapitanleutnant Gunther Prien in U47. He slipped through the defences of the Royal Navy's wartime anchorage in the Orkneys and put four torpedoes into the dreadnought on 14th October 1939. The battleship sank in less than 15 minutes; of her ship's company of more than 1200, 833 perished.
 
Napoleon and Doctor Verling on St Helena
Napoleon and Doctor Verling on St Helena
J. David Markham
£19.99
15th October 1815
Napoleon begins exile on Saint Helena
Napoleon was imprisoned and then exiled by the British to the island of Saint Helena from 15 October 1815. Before Napoleon moved to Longwood House in November 1815, he lived in a pavilion on the estate "The Briars" belonging to William Balcombe, and became friendly with the family, especially the younger daughter Lucia Elizabeth (Betsy), who later wrote "Recollections of the Emperor Napoleon".
 
Fighter Aces of the Luftwaffe in World War II
Fighter Aces of the Luftwaffe in World War II
Philip Kaplan
£15.99
was £19.99
16th October 1939
Hitler's First Aerial Attack on Britian
The first aerial attack on British territory occurred on 16th October 1939. At 1100 hours, 15 Junkers JU -88 of 1/KG 30 led by Hauptman Helmuth Pohle took off from Westerland. They were on route to bomb their intended target, HMS Hood, which had been sighted off the Scottish coast. The airman had instructions from Hitler not to attack the Hood if she had reached dry dock. 
 
By the time the aircraft flew over the Forth Bridge, HMS Hood had reached the 'safety' of the dock, but there were other targets in view. However, the German aircraft had been spotted. Tribal Class HMS Mohawk opened fire on the Junkers. Unfortunately the aircraft had time to release 2 bombs which exploded close to the ships, killing 15 men and injuring 30 others.
 
Railway of Hell
Railway of Hell
War Captivity and Forced Labour at the Hands of the Japanese
Lt Col. Reginard Burton
£12.99
17th October 1943
Completion of the Burma Railway
The Burma Railway, also known as the Death Railway, is a 415 kilometres railway between Bangkok, Thailand, and Rangoon, Burma, built by the Empire of Japan during World War II, to support its forces in the Burma Campaign. Forced labour was used in its construction. About 180,000 Asian labourers and 60,000 Allied prisoners of war worked on the railway. On 17 October 1943, the two sections of the line met about 18 km south of the Three Pagodas Pass at Konkuita. Most of the POWs were then transported to Japan.
 
The Battle of Trafalgar
The Battle of Trafalgar
Geoffrey Bennett
£7.99
21st October 1805
Nelson victorious at the Battle of Trafalgar
In one of the most decisive battles in history, a British fleet under Admiral Horatio Nelson defeats a combined French and Spanish fleet at the Battle of Trafalgar fought off the coast of Spain.  
 
At sea, Lord Nelson and the Royal Navy consistently thwarted Napoleon, who led France to pre-eminence on the European mainland. After the crushing defeat at Trafalgar, Napoleon was forced to abandon his plans for an invasion of England.
 
Alamein
Alamein
Philip Warner
£19.99
23rd October 1942
Second Battle of El Alamein
At El Alamein in northern Egypt, the British Eighth Army under Field Marshal Montgomery begin a critical offensive to expel the Axis armies from Egypt, never to return.
 
Agincourt
Agincourt
Bernard Cornwell, Michael K Jones
£12.99
25th October 1415
Battle of Agincourt
On St Crispin's Day, 25 October 1415, Henry V's small English force routed the French in the most famous clash of the Hundred Years' War. On a battlefield east of the tiny village of Agincourt in northern France, the English king's heavily outnumbered army repelled the massed attacks of the enemy and killed or captured leading members of the French nobility. The encounter changed the course of the war and its impact on English history endures to this day.
 
Famous Aircraft
Famous Aircraft
Combat Planes in World War Two
£6.99
26th October 1940
P-51 Mustang makes its maiden flight
The first prototype, designated NA-73X, took flight on 26 Oct 1940, merely 117 days after the order was placed. It handled well, and most significantly, offered a long range with its high fuel load. It also had room to house heavier armament than the British Spitfire fighters.  
 
The first design suffered some performance drawbacks at high altitudes, but otherwise it still impressed RAF Air Fighter Development Unit's commanding officer. As the British Royal Air Force came to like the P-51 Mustang fighters, the US Army Air Corps also placed an order for them to be used as ground attack and dive bomber aircraft. Dubbed A-36 Apache, the US Army name were not as common-place as the British Mustang designation. Very soon, the US Army also began using the Mustang name.
 
Launch Pad UK: Britain & the Cuban Missile Crisis
Launch Pad UK: Britain & the Cuban Missile Crisis
Jim Wilson OBE
£19.99
27th October 1962
US Air Force Pilot shot down over Cuba
Major Rudolf Anderson of the United States Air Force becomes the only direct human casualty of the Cuban Missile Crisis when his U-2 reconnaissance airplane is shot down in Cuba by a Soviet-supplied SA-2 Guideline surface-to-air missile.
 
Suez
Suez
Roy Fullick, Geoffrey Powell
£10.99
was £12.99
29th October 1956
Suez Crisis
The Suez Crisis was provoked by an American and British decision not to finance Egypt’s construction of the Aswan High Dam, as they had promised, in response to Egypt’s growing ties with communist Czechoslovakia and the Soviet Union.  
 
Nasser reacted to the American and British decision by declaring martial law in the canal zone and seizing control of the Suez Canal Company, predicting that the tolls collected from ships passing through the canal would pay for the dam’s construction within five years. Britain and France feared that Nasser might close the canal and cut off shipments of petroleum flowing from the Persian Gulf to western Europe.  
 
When diplomatic efforts to settle the crisis failed, Britain and France secretly prepared military action to regain control of the canal and, if possible, to depose Nasser. They found a ready ally in Israel, who crossed the Sinai Peninsula into Egypt heading towards the Suez Canal on October 29.
 
November
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Walcheren
Walcheren
Operation Infatuate
Andrew Rawson
£9.95
1st November 1944
WWII: Units of the British Army land at Walcheren in the Netherlands
The Battle of Walcheren Causeway was an engagement of the Battle of the Scheldt between the 5th Canadian Infantry Brigade, elements of the British 52nd (Lowland) Infantry Division, notably the Glasgow Highlanders, and troops of the German 15th Army in 1944, in an attempt to remove German defences on both sides of the waterway leading into Antwerp to allow the captured port to be used.
 
Ladysmith
Ladysmith
The Siege
Lewis Childs
£9.95
2nd November 1899
Seige of Ladysmith Begins
The Boers begin their 118 day siege of British held Ladysmith during the Second Boer War. 
 
Overall the British suffered 175 killed and 249 wounded. 52 dead Boers were left in the British positions, but their total casualties were not recorded.
 
Wilfred Owen
Wilfred Owen
Philip Guest, Helen McPhail
£8.00
was £9.95
4th November 1918
WWI War Poet Wilfred Owen dies
Wilfred Owen was a British poet and soldier, one of the leading poets of the First World War. His shocking, realistic war poetry on the horrors of trenches and gas warfare was heavily influenced by his friend Siegfried Sassoon and sat in stark contrast to both the public perception of war at the time, and to the confidently patriotic verse written earlier by war poets such as Rupert Brooke.  
 
He was killed in action at the Battle of the Sambre, just a week before the war ended.
 
Escape From Auschwitz
Escape From Auschwitz
Andrey Pogozhev
£19.99
6th November 1942
Escape From Auschwitz
On 6 November 1942, 70 captured Red Army soldiers staged an extraordinary mass escape from Auschwitz.
 
1918: Last Battles of WW1 & the Armistice
1918: Last Battles of WW1 & the Armistice
£6.99
11th November 1918
End of World War I
11th minute, of the 11th hour, on the 11th day - 1918. No other war had changed the map of Europe so dramatically - four empires disappeared: the German, Austro-Hungarian, Ottoman and the Russian. Four defunct dynasties, the Hohenzollerns, the Habsburg, Romanovs and the Ottomans together with all their ancillary aristocracies, all fell after the war. Belgium was badly damaged, as was France with 1.4 million soldiers dead, not counting other casualties. Germany and Russia were similarly affected.
 
Battles On The Tigris
Battles On The Tigris
Ron Wilcox
£15.99
was £19.99
14th November 1918
Mesopotamian campaign ends
The war in Mesopotamia was over on 14 November 1918, 13 days after the Armistice of Mudros was signed, and the same day as the occupation of Istanbul.
 
Assault on Germany
Assault on Germany
The Battle for Geilenkirchen
Ken Ford
£19.99
18th November 1944
WWII: Operation Clipper - Battle for Geilenkirchen
Part of Operation Clipper, the Battle for Geilenkirchen was the first battle on German soil to be fought by the British since Minden in 1759. For them, it was just one more battle on the way to Berlin, but for the American 84th Division, it was a first faltering step into war and a bitter lesson in the attrition and savagery of combat.
 
Touring the Italian Front
Touring the Italian Front
1917-1919
Francis Mackay
£8.00
was £9.95
19th November 1917
WWI: End of Battle of Caporetto
The Battle of Caporetto took place from 24th October to 19th November 1917, near the town of Kobarid (now in Slovenia), on the Austro-Italian front of World War I. The battle was named after the Italian name of the town of Kobarid. 
 
Austro-Hungarian forces, reinforced by German units, were able to break into the Italian front line and rout the Italian army, which had practically no mobile reserves. The battle was a demonstration of the effectiveness of the use of stormtroopers and the infiltration tactics developed in part by Oskar von Hutier. The use of poison gas by the Germans played a key role in the collapse of the Italian Second Army.
 
The Ironclads of Cambrai
The Ironclads of Cambrai
Bryan Cooper
£15.99
was £19.99
20th November 1917
The Battle of Cambrai
The Battle of Cambrai was a British campaign of the First World War. Noted for the first successful use of tanks in a combined arms operation, the British attack demonstrated that the Hindenburg Line could be penetrated, while the German counter attack showed the value of new infantry tactics that would later be part of the Kaiserschlacht. Liddell Hart called the battle "one of the landmarks in the history of warfare, the dawn of a new epoch."
 
Dave Molyneux The Racer's Edge
Dave Molyneux The Racer's Edge
Memories of an Isle of Man TT Legend
Dave Molyneux, Matthew Richardson
£19.99
21st November 1963
Dave Molyneux was born
Dave Molyneux is a Sidecar TT racer with fourteen Isle of Man TT wins and has had more TT wins than any other sidecar TT racer.
 
Assassination
Assassination
Miles Hudson
£19.99
22nd November 1963
Assassination of JFK
On 22 November 1963, the world was horror-struck by the news that American President John F Kennedy was dead – shot by a hidden assassin in Dallas, Texas. JFK, the youngest man elected President and the youngest President to die at 46 years old, was hardly past his first thousand days in office when the bullet struck as his motorcade made its way through Dallas.
 
Britain Under Fire
Britain Under Fire
Charles Whiting
£19.95
26th November 1944
German V-2 Rocket kills 168 shoppers in London
At lunchtime on 26th November 1944, a German V-2 rocket fell on a packed Woolworths store in New Cross Road, killing 168 people (including 15 children), injuring 122 others and razing the building to the ground. The neighbouring London Co-operative Society store was also demolished in the attack.
 
The Battle of the Berezina
The Battle of the Berezina
Napoleon's Great Escape
Alexander Mikaberidze
£19.99
29th November 1812
Battle of Berezina ends
In the winter of 1812, Napoleon's army retreated from Moscow under appalling conditions, hunted by three separate Russian armies, its chances of survival apparently nil.  
 
By late November Napoleon had reached the banks of the River Berezina - the last natural obstacle between his army and the safety of the Polish frontier. But instead of finding the river frozen solid enough to march his men across, an unseasonable thaw had turned the Berezina into an icy torrent. Having already ordered the burning of his bridging equipment, Napoleon's predicament was serious enough: but with the Russian army of Admiral Chichagov holding the opposite bank. 
 
The battle ended with a mixed outcome. The French suffered very heavy losses but managed to cross the river and avoid being trapped.
 
The Flying Scotsman
The Flying Scotsman
The Legend Lives On
Brian Sharpe
£19.99
30th November 1934
Flying Scotsman becomes the first steam locomotive to reach 100mph
The LNER Class A3 Pacific locomotive no. 4472 "Flying Scotsman" (originally no. 1472) was built in 1923 for the London and North Eastern Railway (LNER) at Doncaster Works to a design of H.N. Gresley.  
 
It was employed on long-distance express trains on the LNER, notably the 10am London to Edinburgh Flying Scotsman service after which this locomotive was named.  
 
On 30th November 1934 it became the first steam locomotive to be officially recorded at 100 mph.
 
December
top of page
The Life of General George Monck
The Life of General George Monck
For King and Cromwell
Peter Reese
£19.99
6th December 1608
George Monck is born
General George Monck is famous for the key role he played in the restoration of the monarchy in 1660 - his actions changed the course of British history.  
 
But his statesmanship in the dangerous time between the death of Cromwell and the bloodless return of Charles II distracts attention from his extraordinary career as a soldier and general, admiral, governor and administrator.  
 
During the confused, often bloody era of the English Civil Wars and the Protectorate, he was one of the great survivors.
 
Japan's Blitzkrieg
Japan's Blitzkrieg
Bernard Edwards
£19.99
7th December 1941
Attack on Pearl Harbor
On the morning of December 7th 1941, aircraft and midget submarines of the Imperial Japanese Navy began a surprise attack on the U.S. under the command of Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto. Despite long-standing assertions that this attack could have been predicted and prevented by the United States Military, the U.S. forces at Pearl Harbor appeared to be utterly unprepared, and the attack effectively drew the United States into World War II. The overall death toll reached 2,350, including 68 civilians, and 1,178 injured. Of the military personnel lost at Pearl Harbor, 1,177 were from the Arizona.
 
The Sinking of the Prince of Wales & Repulse
The Sinking of the Prince of Wales & Repulse
Patrick Mahoney, Martin Middlebrook
£13.50
was £16.99
10th December 1941
The Sinking of the Prince of Wales & Repulse
The Second World War: British battleships Prince of Wales and Repulse are sunk by Japanese bombers and submarines in the South China Sea, just three days after the USA and Britain had declared war with Japan.
 
Battle of the River Plate
Battle of the River Plate
A Grand Delusion
Richard Woodman
£19.99
13th December 1939
Battle of the River Plate
The Battle of the River Plate was the first major naval confrontation of the Second World War, and it is one of the most famous. The dramatic sea fight between German pocket battleship Admiral Graf Spee and the British cruisers Exeter, Ajax and Achilles off the coast of South America caught the imagination in December 1939. Over the last 60 years the episode has come to be seen as one of the classics of naval warfare.
 
Haig: Master of the Field
Haig: Master of the Field
Major-General John Davidson
£15.99
was £19.99
15th December 1915
Haig becomes commander-in-chief
In December 1915, Haig replaced French as Commander-in-Chief of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF), with French returning to Britain.  
 
Haig had been intriguing for the removal of French as commander of the BEF and had told King George V that French was "a source of great weakness to the army and no one had confidence in him any more".
 
Battle of the Bulge
Battle of the Bulge
Andrew Rawson
£12.99
16th December 1944
WWII: Start of the Battle of the Bulge
Hitler's desperate last throw during the depths of winter 1944/45 came perilously close to being a major disaster for the Allies. Their offensive through the Ardennes fell on the Americans and caught them totally by surprise. Unaccustomed to set-backs, the situation was for a time extremely serious and in some areas panic set in and events went out of control. It was only after the most bitter fighting and massive reinforcement that the rot was stopped.
 
Massacre at Malmedy
Massacre at Malmedy
Charles Whiting
£12.99
was £14.99
17th December 1944
WWII: Malmedy massacre
Kampfgruppe Peiper, part of the 1st SS Panzer Division, massacres 84 unarmed American Prisoners of War at Malmedy.
 
Walking Verdun
Walking Verdun
A Guide to the Battlefield
Christina Holstein
£10.39
was £12.99
18th December 1916
WWI: The Battle of Verdun Ends
The Battle of Verdun, the longest engagement of the Second World War, ends after 10 months and massive loss of life. By the time of the French victory on 18th December, 23 million shells had been fired and 650,000 lives lost.
 
Hitler as Military Commander
Hitler as Military Commander
John Strawson
£6.99
19th December 1941
Adolf Hitler becomes Supreme Commander-in-Chief of the German Army
When Adolf Hitler assumed power, he granted his war minister, Werner von Blomberg, the title of Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces. However, in 1938, Hitler took the title of Commander-in-Chief himself and assumed personal command of the Armed Forces.
 
At Hitler's Side
At Hitler's Side
The Memoirs of Hitler s Luftwaffe Adjutant
Nicolaus von Below
£14.99
20th December 1924
Hitler released from Landsberg Prison
In 1924 Adolf Hitler spent eight months incarcerated in Landsberg after being convicted of treason following the Beer Hall Putsch in Munich the previous year.  
 
During his imprisonment, Hitler dictated and then wrote his book Mein Kampf with assistance from his deputy, Rudolf Hess.
 
St Vith
St Vith
US 106th Infantry Division
Michael Tolhurst
£9.95
21st December 1944
WWII: US Troops fall back from St. Vith
Following a successfully resistance to the German attacks by 7th US Armored Division and including the remaining regiment of the 106th US Infantry, St. Vith was given up by General Clarke on 21st December. US troops fell back to entrenched positions in the area in an attempt to present an imposing obstacle to any successful German advances.
 
Ike's Last Battle
Ike's Last Battle
Charles Whiting
£19.95
24th December 1943
WWII: Eisenhower becomes the Supreme Allied Commander.
U.S. General Dwight D. Eisenhower becomes the Supreme Allied Commander.
 
Frederick
Frederick
The Wonder of the World
Richard D Bressler
£19.99
26th December 1194
Frederick II of Hohenstaufen was born
One of the most remarkable personalities of the Middle Ages, Frederick II of Hohenstaufen was born in 1194. His parents - the reigning Holy Roman Emperor and the heiress to the Kingdom of Sicily - belonged to two of the leading ruling families in medieval Europe. 
 
Known as "Stupor mundi" (the "wonder of the world") he was one of the most powerful Holy Roman Emperors of the Middle Ages. Throughout his life he was King of the Romans, King of Germany, King of Italy, and of Burgundy. At the age of three he was crowned King of Sicily. His other royal title was King of Jerusalem.
 
The Battle for Afghanistan
The Battle for Afghanistan
The Soviets Versus the Majahideen During the 1980s
Mark Adkin, Mohammad Yousaf
£12.99
27th December 1979
Start of the Soviet war in Afghanistan
This nine-year conflict involving the Soviet Union, supporting the Marxist government of the Democratic Republic of Afghanistan at their own request, against the Islamist Mujahideen Resistance. The Afghan government was also supported by India, while the mujahideen found other support from a variety of sources including the United States, Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, and other Muslim nations through the context of the Cold War and the regional India-Pakistan conflict. 
 
Due to the interminable nature of the war, the conflict in Afghanistan has often been referred to as the Soviets' Vietnam; in relation to the Vietnam War.
 
Walking The London Blitz
Walking The London Blitz
Clive Harris
£12.99
29th December 1940
Worst air raid on London
On the evening of 29th December 1940, London suffers its most devastating air raid when German planes firebomb the city. Hundreds of fires caused by the exploding bombs engulfed areas of London, but fire fighters showed a valiant indifference to the bombs falling around them and saved much of the city from destruction.
 
Swift to Battle: 72 Fighter Squadron RAF in Action
Swift to Battle: 72 Fighter Squadron RAF in Action
Volume 2: North Africa, Malta, Sicily, Southern France and Austria
Tom Docherty
£25.00
30th December 1946
No. 72 Squadron RAF disbanded following WWII
No. 72 squadron was reformed on 22nd February 1937 from 'B' flight of No. 1 Squadron. In 1939, the squadron was outfitted with Spitfires which replaced the Gloster Gladiators that came with the flight from No. 1 Squadron. These were used in Air defence and convoy protection duties following the start of the war. Then, in 1940, the squadron moved to assist in the evacuation of Dunkirk. 
 
During the Battle of Britain, No 72 spent the early days at RAF Acklington as part of No. 13 Group RAF, before moving south during September to aid the main defence force. The squadron was then moved to North Africa to support the Tunisian campaign before being supplied with the updated Spitfire IX in 1942. They then assisted the British 8th Army as they advanced through Italy and France up until the German surrender. At this point they were moved to Austria. It was here they were disbanded on 30 December 1946.
 
Red Sky in the Morning
Red Sky in the Morning
Michael Pearson
£10.99
was £12.99
31st December 1942
Battle of the Barents Sea
Convoy JW51B sailed in December 1942 with a small close escort of five destroyers, plus a reserve of two light cruisers, which shadowed the main convoy at a distance of seventy miles. The convoy was attacked on the 31st December by a powerful German force that included the heavy cruiser Admiral Hipper, the pocket battleship Ltzow and six destroyers. The ensuing engagement proved the worth of the British destroyers and the bravery of the men who sailed in them. It was a naval engagement that had far-reaching consequences and resulted in many capital ships of the Kriegsmarine being decommissioned for the rest of World War II.