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Daughters of Edward I (Hardback)

British History Medieval History P&S History Royal History

By Kathryn Warner
Imprint: Pen & Sword History
Pages: 248
Illustrations: 20 black and white illustrations
ISBN: 9781526750273
Published: 15th July 2021

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In 1254 the teenage heir to the English throne married a Spanish bride, the sister of the king of Castile, in Burgos, and their marriage of thirty-six years proved to be one of the great royal romances of the Middle Ages. Edward I of England and Leonor of Castile had at least fourteen children together, though only six survived into adulthood, five of them daughters.

Daughters of Edward I traces the lives of these five capable, independent women, including Joan of Acre, born in the Holy Land, who defied her father by marrying a second husband of her own choice, and Mary, who did not let her forced veiling as a nun stand in the way of the life she really wanted to live. The women's stories span the decades from the 1260s to the 1330s, through the long reign of their father, the turbulent reign of their brother Edward II, and into the reign of their nephew, the child-king Edward III.

An interesting read about women I honestly didn't know a thing about previously. Edward I's daughters really aren't a topic of discussion, but they're very interesting women. I'd love to read more about Mary of Woodstock (the nun) and Joan of Acre.

NetGalley, Caidyn Young

Kathryn Warner did her usual meticulous research to write Daughters of Edward I. This book is jam packed with information, and brings to life the lives of women who are typically overlooked once they were married. An excellent resource.

NetGalley, Sheila Lynn

Really enjoyed this! No matter how many books I read about English history, there are always new fascinating stories to unearth. This book humanized the characters and provided glimpses into daily life in medieval Europe. A reexamination of the daughters of Edward I is both timely and appreciated. I'll be recommending this one!

NetGalley, Josh Coe

Warner has taken on the difficult task of trying to uncover the stories of the daughters of Edward I and Leonor of Castile and has given readers a resource that can prove valuable in understanding this complex family dynamic. There were parts where the writing was a touch dry for my taste, but overall I found it a stimulating reading and that is because of the laborious research that Warner partook to tell their tales and the tales of their descendants. If you want a meticulously researched resource that tells the stories of women who knew Edward I, Edward II, and Edward III well, “Daughters of Edward I” by Kathryn Warner is the perfect book for you to add to your collection.

NetGalley, Heidi Malagisi

This book is packed full of information, starting with a practically unheard of happy marriage between Edward I and his wife, Leonor. It was interesting to learn about their children, particularly the daughters in such detail as their influence was relatively unheard of at the time.

NetGalley, Lauren Hudspeth

This book is about more than just the daughters of Edward I. With the information presented, you can dive into the web of the royal family - the who's who of the time.

Kathryn Warner did a great job of bringing as much information as she could about the five daughters of Edward I, and their ups and downs throughout life.

I enjoyed reading through this book!

NetGalley, Rebecca Hill

Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

Thoroughly enjoyed this fascinating family history. As Warner says early on in her book, the chronicles are often silent on the lives of medieval women. Even female royalty are passed over in scant references to their dates of marriage, offspring and death. This book wonderfully fills in the blanks in the map, in giving the reader a portrait of each of the daughters of Edward I.
Following her tremendous biography of Edward II, Warner turns her attention to his sisters, and the result is a frequently moving and revelatory family chronicle. Edward I and his Queen Leonor seem to have had a very close relationship with their daughters, and I was often surprised by their remarkably permissive interactions - such as the King paying off his daughter's gambling debts!
Highly recommend this book for those interested in medieval history, these women deserve to be remembered not only as the ancestors of Henry V, Richard III and Margaret of Anjou, but as vital and varied characters living in a time of cultural upheaval.

NetGalley, Ash Caton

Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

A history book that is centered around the children of Edward I, while describing an intricate web of royal families and the nobility of the 13th and 14th centuries. An informative and well-researched read, split into easy-to-digest chapters. Whenever the author is discussing a person, she gives context and interpretation, which allows you to see the big picture of who is related to whom throughout Europe.
Despite being hopeless at history myself, I truly enjoyed this.

NetGalley, Anita Salát

Kathryn Warner presents a fascinating view of the medieval King Edward I's relationship with his royal daughters. The author did an excellent job at describing how Edward I related to each of his daughters from childhood to adulthood. Although the book is titled Daughters of Edward I, the book explores the many relationships between Edward I his wife Eleanor of Castile, his in-laws, and even his grandchildren.

Daughters of Edward I vividly brings to life characters who would otherwise be obscure historical figures. I found the book very readable. The book can be enjoyed by a scholar or someone with a casual interest in history. I have read many books about Edward I, Edward II, and Edward III, but Kathryn Warner still surprised me with interest facts I had never come across in my reading.

If you are fascinated by Edward I and want to learn more about his many daughters and sons, I highly recommend this book. Besides presenting King Edward I's daughters and following their life from birth to death, the author includes many compelling details about Edward II, his son Edward III, and the many problems which plagued their reign and their lives.

NetGalley, Elizabeth Crowley

Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

A delightful & insightful portrait of five exceptional princesses, the daughters of Edward Longshanks, one of England's most revered monarchs.
An informative and utterly compelling tapestry of late 13th century English royal life through the births, educational journeys and marital destinies of five sisters and their individual roles in their father's political spectrum.
Anyone interested by Medieval civilization and its little known histories should definitely enjoy this very detailed look at royal children and their rather peripatetic upbringing during a rather tumultuous period of English history. Ms Warner has gifted us with a worthy addition to the historiography of the Plantagenets and their magnificent world. An elegant and very detailed achievement that I found personally very engrossing
& totally satisfying!

NetGalley, Jean Luc Estrella

About Kathryn Warner

Kathryn Warner holds a BA and an MA with Distinction in medieval history and literature from the University of Manchester, and is the author of biographies about Edward II and his queen Isabella. Kathryn has had work published in the English Historical Review, has given a paper at the International Medieval Congress, and appeared in a BBC documentary.

Perfect Partner

Edward II's Nieces: The Clare Sisters Powerful Pawns of the Crown (Hardback)

The de Clare sisters Eleanor, Margaret and Elizabeth were born in the 1290s as the eldest granddaughters of King Edward I of England and his Spanish queen Eleanor of Castile, and were the daughters of the greatest nobleman in England, Gilbert ‘the Red’ de Clare, earl of Gloucester. They grew to adulthood during the turbulent reign of their uncle Edward II, and all three of them were married to men involved in intense, probably romantic or sexual, relationships with their uncle. When their elder brother Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester, was killed during their uncle’s catastrophic defeat…

By Kathryn Warner

Click here to buy both titles for £45.00
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