Facebook Twitter Youtube Instagram Pinterest LinkedIn

Operation Dragoon (Hardback)

The Liberation of Southern France 1944

WWII D-Day & Normandy

By Anthony Tucker-Jones
Imprint: Pen & Sword Military
Pages: 224
ISBN: 9781848841406
Published: 15th October 2009
Last Released: 21st October 2009

in_stock

£19.99


You'll be £19.99 closer to your next £10.00 credit when you purchase Operation Dragoon. What's this?

+£4 UK Delivery or free UK delivery if order is over £30
(click here for international delivery rates)

Need a currency converter? Check XE.com for live rates

Order within the next 11 hours, 4 minutes to get your order processed the next working day!

Other formats available - Buy the Hardback and get the eBook for free! Price
Operation Dragoon Kindle (9.8 MB) Add to Basket £4.99
Operation Dragoon ePub (7.0 MB) Add to Basket £4.99


Operation Dragoon, the Allied landings in the south of France in August 1944, is seen as a sideshow supporting Operation Overlord, the crucial D-Day landings in Normandy. Often the operation is criticized as an expensive diversion of men and equipment from the struggle against the German armies in Italy. Yet, as Anthony Tucker-Jones shows in his new in-depth study, Dragoon and the subsequent Allied advance across southern France played a central role in the liberation of Europe, and the operation had far-reaching political and military ramifications.

Controversy dogged the plan from the start. Fierce disagreement among the senior Allied commanders and politicians - in particular between Churchill, Eisenhower and de Gaulle - threatened to weaken the Anglo-American war effort. In vivid detail
Anthony Tucker-Jones tells the story of the high-level strategic arguments that gave birth to Dragoon, and he looks at the impact of the operation on the direction and duration of the war against Nazi Germany.

He also recounts the course of the invasion on the ground - the massive logistical effort required, the landings themselves, the role played by the French resistance, and the bitter battles fought against German rearguards as they sought to retain France's southern cities and cover their withdrawal toward the strategic Belfort Gap.

Operation Dragoon is one of the lesser known operations in the Mediterranean. It is usually known as the liberation of southern France, but was a disputed operation right from the start. It took place AFTER the D-Day landings in Normandy and many thought it really did little to support the allied advance from Normandy towards the low countries and Germany.

This book describes Operation Dragoon, yes, but in fact it describes much more of what went on ahead of it. The arguments, bickering, doubts and discussions between the major powers and characters of that time. In fact the operation was promised to Stalin as a way to take the pressure off his major offensive in the east. But specifically Churchill didn't believe it should be executed. He thought it was taking too many resources away from the allied other goals. Churchill also wanted a much larger presence in the eastern hemisphere.

Alas, that didn't happen and in the end Operation Dragoon was executed, landing allied troops all along the French Riviera coast, where they met little resistance, for various reasons.
Only the second half of the book is in fact describing the actual battles, the first part being almost entirely about the political and military discussions leading up to the operation.

A very interesting account of what happened in that area and WHY things happened as they did.

Silver Cloud Publishing

"The Allied invasion of Southern France, in August 1944, is a subject that is unfamiliar if not unknown to most with only a casual interest in the Second World War, not least because this "other D-Day" was seen as something of an expensive distraction from the main campaigns which were well underway in Normandy and Italy at the time, and whose achievements, in the years since, have generally been derided by a succession of commentators. Anthony Tucker-Jones presents a comprehensive overview of the landings, the aftermath and their impact on the wider campaign, revealing a number of useful successes which made no small contribution to the liberation of France, but which might have been small compensation for the potentially more decisive prizes which could have been won had this force and its vast resources been concentrated elsewhere. He also places very considerable emphasis on the political aspects of this operation, the planning of which caused considerable disharmony between the Allies, and indeed reached a point where an enormously sceptical Winston Churchill threatened to collapse his government. Fascinating reading."

Pegasus Archive - Mark Hickman

Oft Misinterpreted and much misunderstood,the allied landings in southern France took place two months after the much better known Normandy landings of D-Day, June 6 ,1944,
The author an enthusiastic re-thinker of conventional military history thinking,has made a very detailed investigation of what really happened in the Mediterranean that Summer.
This book is a very worthwhile contribution to this ongoing controversy.

work Boat World Magazine

Oft misinterpreted and much misunderstood, the Allied landings in Southern France took place two months after the much better known Normandy landings of D-Day. The author, an enthusiastic re-thinker of conventional military history thinking, has made a very detailed investigation of what really happened in the Mediterranean that summer.

He shows clearly that Operation Dragoon was not, as is often claimed, a sideshow to the main event in Normandy. After considerable disagreement, Eisenhower, Churchill and de Gaulle proved that the French, British and Americans really could work together effectively. They also managed to co-ordinate well with the French Resistance in this operation.

The result of this amazing co-operation was a major contributor to the eventual Allied victory. This book is a very worthwhile contribution to this ongoing controversy.

Work Boat World

Often misinterpreted and much misunderstood, the Allied landings in southern France took place two months after the much better known Normandy landings of D-Day, June 6, 1944.

The author, an enthusiastic re-thinker of conventional military history thinking, has made a very detailed investigation of what really happened in the Mediterranean that summer.

He shows very clearly that Operation Dragoon was not, as if often claimed, a sideshow to the main event in Normandy. After considerable disagreement, Eisenhower, Churchill and de Gaulle proved that the French, British and Americans really could work together effectively. They also managed to co-ordinate well with the French Resistance in this operation.

The result of this amazing co-operation, supported by a massive logistics exercise, afloat and ashore, was a major contributor to the eventual Allied victory. This book is a very worthwhile contribution to this ongoing controversy.

Baird Maritime

Anthony Tucker-Jones has produced a well-researched and very readable account of these events, viewed from the political and strategic levels.

Tank Journal

Tucker-Jones's work benefits from his decision to place Operation Dragoon in its wider context, which was rather more important than the campaign itself. The result is a book that sheds some valuable light on a relatively neglected campaign.

History of War.org

About Anthony Tucker-Jones

Anthony Tucker-Jones is one of Pen & Sword’s leading authors. He has written well over 30 books including a number of the highly successful Images of War series – he also wrote the recent six part Modern Warfare series for Pen & Sword.

He started his writing career freelancing for the internationally renowned Jane’s Defence Weekly and Jane’s Intelligence Review. Subsequently he was recruited by British Defence Intelligence for his expertise. Since then he has forged a career as a fulltime author and writer. He has contributed to numerous aviation, military and naval magazines and made regular media appearances.

In addition he specialises in counter-terrorism and has been the freelance terrorism and security correspondent for intersec - The Journal of International Security. This highly respected magazine is the principal publication for the UK’s security industry. Further information can be found on his website at www.atuckerjones.com

WWII: Start of Operation Dragoon

15th August 1944

Operation Dragoon was the Allied invasion of southern France on August 15, 1944, during World War II. The successfull invasion was initiated via a parachute drop by the 1st Airborne Task Force, followed by an amphibious assault by elements of the U.S. Seventh Army, followed a day later by a force made up primarily of the French First Army.


View all anniversaries

Perfect Partner

Churchill's Spearhead The Development of Britain's Airborne Forces in WWI (Hardback)

This book covers the inception, growth and employment of Britain's airborne forces (parachute and glider-borne formations) between June 1940 and March 1945. It takes a comparative approach and follows tailored lines of development. Each of these lines - politics and policy, equipment and technology, personnel and training, command and control and concepts and doctrine - influence each other. The contents include: Politics and Policy: The political environment within which the major decisions were made concerning the concept of development of Britain's airborne forces. Churchill's personal contribution,…

By John Greenacre

Click here to buy both titles for £39.98
More titles by Anthony Tucker-Jones

Customers who bought this title also bought...

Other titles in Pen & Sword Military...