Military History Books

Military Biography


Pen and Sword have a strong tradition for publishing biographies, particularly first hand accounts. Autobiographies have always been a cornerstone of our publishing list and we have a rich history of important original accounts of key battles in history. First hand accounts always tell a unique story. We always learn something new about a battle no matter what role the author played. The key part was that they were an eyewitness to events and uniquely qualified to enhance our study of history.

We are immensely proud of this collection of Biographies which have taken many years to build up and now is broken down by conflict.



The name of Major John Howard is synonymous with the assault on Pegasus Bridge during the first minutes of the D-Day landings, and while many books have attempted to describe this most famous of actions, there can surely be no substitute for the words of the man who trained, planned and led the attack. The Pegasus Diaries is an extremely detailed and personal memoir of a man who was commissioned from the ranks into the 2nd Battalion The Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, and it follows his career from taking command of "D" Company in 1942 to the end of the war, including the intense training leading up to D-Day and his account of all that took place on the 6th June 1944. It continues to describe his part in the remainder of the Normandy campaign, and also the tragic end to his career when he was badly injured in a road accident and, despite his best efforts to recover and return to the Airborne, ultimately invalided out of the Army.

Pegasus Archive

A workman-like biography, describing the life and unusual naval career of a very professional and unquestionably brave naval officer.

Navy Today (New Zealand)

'It is a joy to read'

Military Illustrated, Gary Sheffield

The author has done a fine job rescuing this interesting and controversial, flawed figure, Crozier - considered a fine 'front line commander' of the Great War - from relative obscurity. The reader of this volume will gain a greater appreciation of the human element of leadership in combat, and will enjoy reading this absorbing account as much as the author seemingly enjoyed writing it.

International Bibliography of Military History

Ian Beckett, who edited this excellent book, follows Rommel's highly successful panzer battles leading to the fall of France in 1940... I found most interesting the opinion of Beckett, a professor of military history at the University of Kent, regarding the part played by Rommel in the July 1944 conspiracy to kill Hitler. Beckett suggests Rommel probably had some idea about the assassination plot but was on the outer margins, that he sympathised with the basic goals of the anti-Hitler Resistance but that he showed no disposition towards the illegal murder of Hitler.

Folkestone Herald