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The Genuine Teachers of This Art (Hardback)

Rhetorical Education in Antiquity

Ancient History > Ancient Greece & the Hellenistic World Ancient History > Rome & the Roman Provinces

Imprint: University of South Carolina Press
Pages: 352
ISBN: 9781611170160
Published: 31st July 2012
Casemate UK Academic

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Genuine Teachers of This Art examines the techne, or handbook, tradition which it controversially suggests began with Isocrates as the central tradition in ancient rhetoric and a potential model for contemporary rhetoric. From this innovative perspective, Jeffrey Walker offers reconsiderations of rhetorical theories and schoolroom practices from early to late antiquity as the true aim of the philosophical rhetoric of Isocrates and as the distinctive expression of what Cicero called the genuine teachers of this art. Walker makes a case for considering rhetoric not as an Aristotelian critical-theoretical discipline, but as an Isocratean pedagogical discipline in which the art of rhetoric is neither an art of producing critical theory nor even an art of producing speeches and texts, but an art of producing speakers and writers. He grounds his study in pedagogical theses mined from revealing against-the-grain readings of Cicero, Isocrates, and Dionysius of Halicarnassus. Walker also locates supporting examples from a host of other sources, including Aelius Theon, Aphthonius, the Rhetoric to Alexander, the Rhetoric to Herennius, Quintilian, Hermogenes, Hermagoras, Lucian, Libanius, Apsines, the Anonymous Seguerianus, and fragments of ancient student writing preserved in papyri. Walker s epilogue considers the relevance of the ancient techne tradition for the modern discipline of rhetoric, arguing that rhetoric is defined foremost by its pedagogical enterprise.

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