General History


At Pen and Sword, we strive to bring you closer to the past. Firstly this can be through helping you trace your roots - our extensive genealogy list has published the works of many leading experts in their field to help you discover your family history. Hand in hand with this is our social history list, which helps your discover what your some of your ancestors did or indeed suffered through.

Transport history, particularly the history of trains and the railways is set to become an important area of our list and this will grow further throughout 2014 and 2015. Local history has dominated our list for many years, particularly when related to War. The Great War was very much fought from a local context and we have many titles focussing on this.

Books on Collectables Discovery Local History Social History The 19th Century Transport History


Lavishly illustrated...the writing is fluid and a joy to read.

Speed Readers

Exhaustively researched yet so very accessible. Steve Ward gives the reader a ringside seat in the greatest show of all. He is the ringmaster precisely directing our attention so we can see, know and feel how circus came down through the ages and remains a vital part of our culture.

Kevin O’Keefe, Director of Circus Minimus

Leigh author Richard Anthony Baker has now firmly established himself as the foremost authority on the British music hall with his latest book, 'British Music Hall – an Illustrated History'. It is all there in this 261-page book, fully illustrated – and with a hilarious note to end the book entitled the 'Final Curtain' in which the great comedian Jimmy Wheeler answered the question: 'What killed music hall?' His analysis is worth the cost of the book alone. Make sure you read it.

Leigh Times

The book is a useful companion to studies of the campaigns.

War History Online

This fantastic read by Adrian Greaves makes a solid stab at clearing up all the myths about Isandlwana. Events at Rorke's Drift and a succession of other bloody encounters are alluded to but not described. The Battle of Isandlwana sent a shockwave through the colonial communities of South Africa and across the world to London, the hub of the Empire, where the news was treated with immense shock.

War History Online