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Bury St Edmunds in the Great War (Paperback)

Local History WWI British History Social History Towns & Cities in the Great War 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918

By Glynis Cooper
Imprint: Pen & Sword Military
Series: Towns & Cities in the Great War
Pages: 103
ISBN: 9781473834019
Published: 2nd February 2017

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The Great War came as a shock to the citizens of Bury St Edmunds, a rural Suffolk town. One day they were celebrating a beautiful, hot August bank holiday at a large well-attended country fête; the next they were plunged into the deadliest war in history. Men from the Suffolk Regiment, who were based in the town’s barracks, marched off to war and fought valiantly in Flanders, France and Gallipoli. Folk left at home devoted their time and energy to supporting the troops, the war effort and themselves, but they also found time to mark the 700th anniversary of the drawing up of Magna Carta in the local abbey and the tercentenary of Shakespeare’s death.

The reality of the war was brutally brought home by the heavy losses of the Suffolk Regiment, and by Zeppelin attacks on Bury in 1915 and 1916. The first attack caused a lot of damage, and the second attack was considerably more serious. Seven people were killed and there were a number of injuries.

Just a few miles from Bury, a battlefield was re-created on the Elveden estate for training troops in the use and mechanics of tank warfare. Elveden had formerly been owned by the last Maharajah of the Punjab and his son, Prince Frederick Duleep Singh, fought for the British in both the Suffolk and Norfolk regiments.

Bury St Edmunds in the Great War tells the remarkable story of a town whose citizens refused to give in, who strived to fight the odds that were stacked against them. They worked hard to ensure the defeat of the kaiser and consequently, in recognition of their war efforts, Bury was awarded a captured German Kaffir tank in 1919.

As featured in

Eastern Daily Press

As featured in

East Anglian Daily Times

About Glynis Cooper

Glynis Cooper is an archaeologist, librarian and novelist with a passion for local history. During the last fifteen years she has researched, written and published over a dozen local history books and a novel. Among her publications are Castle Hill: Glossop's Other Fort, St Martins: The Roman Fort of Scilly, Longdendale: The Travellers' Valley, and The Illustrated History of Manchester's Suburbs. Currently she is compiling Spinning the Web, a site based on the history of the textile industry in northwest England.

Perfect Partner

The Black Country in the Great War (Paperback)

This is not a book about the Great War; it is about life during the war. Changes in people's lives: their work, home, food, entertainment and news. I used original research material including newspapers, to paint a picture of life in the Black Country. Manufacturing was vital; we were well-equipped to supply the engines of war. The region had motor manufacturers who made aero engines, tanks, guns, munitions and much more. Towards the end of the war the Black Country became one huge munitions works! Some of the greatest changes were societal, women's role changed massively. Wider social change…

By Michael Pearson

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