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The History of Men's Accessories (ePub)

A Short Guide for Men About Town

British History P&S History

By Nicholas Storey
Imprint: Remember When
File Size: 2.2 MB (.epub)
Pages: 192
ISBN: 9781848849921
Published: 9th February 2011

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This idiosyncratic book takes the reader on a fascinating journey, from high-end grooming and care, including open razors, strops and Belgian waterstone; silver-tipped badger shaving brushes, shaving soaps and D R Harris's Pick-me-up, loofahs and sponges, through colognes and scents, including history, constituents, triggers and individual colognes, then into dressing accessories, such as slippers, watches, cufflinks and shirt studs, and tie pins, even how to assess precious stones as well as a fascinating account, from primary sources, of the evolution of the dinner jacket-Tuxedo. Moreover, if you want to know not just how to mix drinks but something of their history, as well as the history of beer, cider and mead; sweets of all kinds, chocolate, tea and coffee; matching food and drink (and not just food and wine) and then every essential fact about tobacco, pipes, Havana cigars, cigarettes and snuff, it's all here, as well as where to buy the products that are mentioned. But it does not stop there. The journey continues on to a consideration of some of London's fascinating venues, including pubs, clubs, restaurants, hotels and bars; some nice points of conduct and the author's reflections on such things as feminine wiles (what women really look for) and even how to stop a fight. There is a chapter on selecting and buying gifts for the lady in your life, a dictionary of Anglo-American sartorial terms and it ends, as it begins, with thoughts of England as home. The author has submitted the book in draft to the scrutiny of leading world experts on the various topics and so, as well as being entertaining, it is backed by authority.

And now for something completely different! This is an entertaining and amusing book written by Nicholas Storey. A book for those interested in the lifestyle of the Man about the Town from the 1900s.

Essex Family Historian, March 2012

Included is a fascinating five-page diversion on the history of the dinner jacket and tuxedo. He writes at length, and with authority, on cigars, cigarettes, pipes, tobacco and snuff. A necessary addition to a Chap's bookshelves for its erudition and quirkiness.

Lindsay Bagshaw from Chap Magazine

History of Men's Accessories is a tribute to British craftsmanship and discernment from the past that has achieved its status today. It looks at some of the smaller personal possessions and some of the acquired tastes that are within the grasp of then successful men.

Characters such as James Bond are enduringly popular as fictional heroes because they combine intellectual and physical vigour with a taste of luxury and yearning for dangerous adventure. This book looks at grooming and care, colognes and scents, dressing accessories, fine drinks and sweets, matching food and drink, smoking and snuff. The author then lists a selection of top venues and gifts for the lady.

The ideal book for anyone interested in men's fashion from the past to the present day.

Antiques Diary

This idiosyncratic book takes the reader on a fascinating journey, from high-end grooming and care, including open razors, strops and Belgian waterstone; silver-tipped badger shaving brushes, shaving soaps and D R Harris's Pick-me-up, loofahs and sponges, through colognes and scents, including history, constituents, triggers and individual colognes, then into dressing accessories, such as slippers, watches, cufflinks and shirt studs, and tie pins, even how to assess precious stones as well as a fascinating account, from primary sources, of the evolution of the dinner jacket-Tuxedo. Moreover, if you want to know not just how to mix drinks but something of their history, as well as the history of beer, cider and mead; sweets of all kinds, chocolate, tea and coffee; matching food and drink (and not just food and wine) and then every essential fact about tobacco, pipes, Havana cigars, cigarettes and snuff, it's all here, as well as where to buy the products that are mentioned. But it does not stop there. The journey continues on to a consideration of some of London's fascinating venues, including pubs, clubs, restaurants, hotels and bars; some nice points of conduct and the author's reflections on such things as feminine wiles (what women really look for) and even how to stop a fight. There is a chapter on selecting and buying gifts for the lady in your life, a dictionary of Anglo-American sartorial terms and it ends, as it begins, with thoughts of England as home. The author has submitted the book in draft to the scrutiny of leading world experts on the various topics and so, as well as being entertaining, it is backed by authority.

By accessories the author really means grooming. This book provides a fascinating insight into the trappings of the upper social classes as they strive to look good. It is certainly an entertaining journey down memory lane, conjuring up thoughts of people like Bertie Wooster and the kind of things Jeeves might have been asked to procure for his master. It's a far cry from what the men of today use, but it's a piece of social history that's overlooked, and the author is to be congratulated for tacklling such a bristly subject. Too few photographs for my liking, otherwise this would have got five stars from me. Four stars it is, then.

Books Monthly

A SHORT miscellany for the discerning man about town, this is a tribute to British craftsmanship of the past, and looks at grooming and care, colognes and scents, dressing accessories, fine drinks and sweets, food and drink, smoking and snuff. From loofahs to cufflinks, from slippers to watches, the book also includes gift suggestions ‘for her’, interesting bookshops, hotels and restaurants and points of conduct.

Best of British

Mr. Storey's guide is a worth while smörgåsbord of unique content for men. A third of it is actually about accessories for grooming, scents and dressing generally. Most of that part is quintessentially English and grounded in the 19th century if not earlier, with the periodic exception of a few modern products such as the scent Ormonde Jane. And the third chapter actually does cover slippers, dressing gowns, collars, braces, watches, pens, pins, jewels in general and throws in several pages that may be the best history of the dinner jacket ever written.

The remainder of the book is an eclectic compendium of topics such as London clubs, gambling venues and drinking establishments; advice on wines and foods from caviar to chocolate; gifts for women; manners; tobacco and a comprehensive selection of cocktails that includes a full page on the history of the Vesper Martini. Fine stuff, and accompanied by the author's encouragement that the content should be enjoyed while smoking and drinking.

A Suitable Wardrobe

Picking the right accessories can be pretty finical so looking for a little advice here and there can be a good choice. And why not take a look back some decades. In comes “The History Of Men’s Accessories” by Nicholas Storey. Learn everything about grooming, colognes, smoking, picking the right shirts, dressing the right way and just about becoming a proper “gentleman”.

The Reference Council

This book is the second in a three part series with the first book being, History of Mens Fasion-What The well Dressed Man is Wearing. This series will be completed with a third book concerned with sports, pleasure and pursuits. History Of Men's Accessories is a well presented, easy reading book that is very informative on etiquette and general grooming. Despite the title, this book is a valuable resource for the modern everyday man about town. Not only does this book provide a very interesting insight to the history of male grooming, men's dressing accessories and smoking, it gives a valuable account on how to behave in public, what drinks to have with food and a guide to interesting venues. There is an excellent chapter on conduct is given that details, 'why one should never lie', 'knowing when to arrive and leave' to 'how to stop a fight'. This book is both historically and socially interesting, age should not be an issue when reading this book, valuable lessons will be learnt regardless of age.

Stephen Wood (Customer Review)

About Nicholas Storey

Nicholas Storey was born in Cornwall. After reading law at University College, London, he qualified as a lawyer and then worked in legal publishing, the government legal service, the city and also spent some time in private practice, before deciding to move to Brazil, to find the time and space in which to write. He is one of two general editors of a text book on health service law and practice and various articles and letters in the British national and local press (as well as The Rio Times); several online publications and is the author of the well-received History of Men's Fashion.

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