Military History Books

Medieval History Books


Pen & Sword has established itself as a leading publisher of medieval military history. Battlefield guides, accounts of decisive battles and sieges, critical biographies of key commanders, and reissues of classic works of the medieval scholarship all feature in our list. And the coverage is not restricted to Britain – important books on the Crusades, the Mongols and warfare in medieval Japan are also part of our publishing programme.

Readers who have a passing interest in medieval warfare and those who have long been fascinated by the subject will all find books here that are stimulating reading.



Useful for the gamer for both general campaign ideas and points of historical departure, and also for more in-depth ideas that could easily translate to the tabletop for certain period events.

Miniature Wargames with Battlegames

Stephen discusses disputed and tantalising aspects of the battle of Agincourt, what went before, and after, at great length and in the most minute detail. To achieve this he has read, digested and summarised an amazing array of facts and opinion. He has consulted more than 70 primary sources and more than 180 books and articles. The result is a magnificent achievement: a triumph of research, writing and publication. I commend it to you. Thank you. Melvyn Jones

Author and Historian Melvyn Jones

A very readable book.

International Association of Cape Horners

A humorous and instructive guide to Elizabethan etiquette which should interest gentlemen of any century.

James Shapiro, author of 1599: A Year in the Life of Shakespeare

In considering an alternative history, the author has explained how and why things turned out as they did. His arguments are involving and logical and they will greatly help readers in understanding the how and why of the actual history. What he cannot do, and neither can anyone else, is paint an accurate picture of an alternative England where Richard III had won the war and continued in a long reign. There simply are not enough reliable documents. Those enthusiasts who favour York will remain convinced that Richard was not the monster of Tudor propaganda and that he would have been a beneficial King, bringing success and prosperity to his people. Those who favour the Tudor pretender will firmly believe that Henry VII was a great king who liberated his people from a lengthy civil war and disposed of a blood-soaked tyrant. The truth may lay somewhere between and the following peace might have been very similar who ever had won the final battle. A fascinating review of the Wars of the Roses.. Read more

Firetrench Reviews