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Hereford Locomotive Shed (ePub)

Engines and Train Workings

Transport History Trains and Railways

By Steve Bartlett
Imprint: Pen & Sword Transport
File Size: 38.1 MB (.epub)
Pages: 227
ISBN: 9781473875579
eBook Released: 6th October 2017

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Hereford Locomotive Shed is the first in a series of in-depth studies to look closely at the changing engine allocations and operational responsibilities of motive power depots during the latter days of steam. In Herefords case this was a varied mixture of main line passenger, freight trip working, branch line passenger, station pilot duties and yard shunting. Unusually, the latter remained a steam preserve until months before depot closure in November 1964. Not forgotten are the depots small sub-sheds, which had varying responsibilities over the years, as the district boundaries changed at Ledbury, Leominster, Ross-on-Wye and Craven Arms. Their very different duties were inevitably a reflection of a bygone age and an all too rapidly changing future.

The author personally recorded the Hereford railway scene from the late 1950s, until depot closure. He made shed visits several times a week, and at other times observed the ever-changing locomotive scene from the elevated Bulmers Sidewalk behind the depots coaling stage. Details carefully kept from those far-off days has proved a valuable cross reference with present-day research into Herefords role from official records at The National Archives, Kew, and other railway research sources.

Having spent almost forty years working in the industry, the author is able to sympathetically unravel and interpret the story of this hard-working mixed traffic depot. Hereford is strategically located on the North & West route from South Wales and the West of England to the North West, as well as being an important junction for Worcester & the West Midlands. Branch lines to Brecon and Gloucester radiated from this Border Counties railway junction, and freight trips radiated out to serve the surrounding area. All of this made Hereford a fascinating rail centre and a locomotive shed worthy of its story for posterity, which is meticulously recorded in this book.

An invaluable record of the life and times of the final years of a most interesting former GWR Locomotive depot and the men and locomotives found theerabouts.

Friends of Swindon Railway Museum

Pen & Sword are rapidly establishing themselves as one of the leading publishers of high quality railway books and this interesting volume is an excellent example. Steve Bartlett is to be congratulated on producing a most readable and authoritative account of a place he obviously remembers with great affection. In doing so he presents us with a valuable picture of life at a typical locomotive depot at the end of the steam era.

Friends of the National Railway Museum

This book succeeds as a historical record, an outstanding album of photographs and a personal tribute to the men, machines and services of Hereford shed.

Great Western Society

As a reference book, this is going to be hard to beat. I would say this could easily become the definitive work on Hereford, not only on the shed and it's workings, but on the whole region within a 60 mile radius of the MPD.

Steve Bartlett has put his heart and soul into illustrating the way Hereford played such a pivotal role in the lives of railwaymen. All the characters, stories and incidents are a true reflection of what life was like from the mid '50s through to closure in the mid '60s and are sourced from staff and records alike.

Manchester Locomotive Society

The author spent over 40 years working in railway operations, timetable and resource planning and does a fine job of lifting the lid on an interesting location and the railways of the surrounding district at this time.

Steam Days, January 2018 - reviewed by Roger Smith

As featured in

Hereford Times

Steve Bartlett is a fourth generation railwayman. In "Hereford Locomotive Shed: Engines and Train Workings" he has published the first in a series of in-depth studies to look closely at the changing engine allocations and operational responsibilities of motive power depots during the latter days of steam. In Herefords case this was a varied mixture of main line passenger, freight trip working, branch line passenger, station pilot duties and yard shunting. Unusually, the latter remained a steam preserve until months before depot closure in November 1964\. Not forgotten are the depots small sub-sheds, which had varying responsibilities over the years, as the district boundaries changed at Ledbury, Leominster, Ross-on-Wye and Craven Arms. Their very different duties were inevitably a reflection of a bygone age and an all too rapidly changing future. Profusely illustrated with black-and-white period photography, "Hereford Locomotive Shed" is an exceptionally informative and well written study and one that will prove to be a critically important and core addition to personal, community, and academic library Railroading History reference collections in general, and Hereford locomotive supplemental studies reading lists in particular.

Midwest Book Review

For anyone who knew Hereford shed this will be a fascinating book, with much detail not to be found elsewhere.

Welsh Railways Research Circle No. 153

About Steve Bartlett

Steve Bartlett is a fourth generation railwayman. His father moved around the Western Region as an Assistant and then District Running & Maintenance Officer, his grandfather worked in Swindon Works and his great-grandfather was a Country Station Master on the South Devon Railway. As a teenager, the author recorded the latter days of steam and joined the railway in January 1966. He spent almost forty years working in rail operations, timetable and resource planning, and on the West Coast Modernisation Project. He now researches and writes about the latter days of steam with an emphasis on engine sheds, their changing allocations and operational duties. He lives in Nantwich, Cheshire, and is married with two sons and four grandchildren.

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