Facebook Twitter Youtube Instagram Pinterest LinkedIn

Portsmouth in the Great War (ePub)

WWI Towns & Cities in the Great War Women of History

By Sarah Quail
Imprint: Pen & Sword Military
File Size: 37.7 MB (.epub)
Pages: 200
ISBN: 9781473847804
Published: 17th December 2014

in_stock

£5.20 RRP £12.99

You save £7.79 (60%)


You'll be £5.20 closer to your next £10.00 credit when you purchase Portsmouth in the Great War. What's this?

Need a currency converter? Check XE.com for live rates

Other formats available Price
Portsmouth in the Great War Paperback Add to Basket £12.99
Portsmouth in the Great War Kindle (47.2 MB) Add to Basket £5.20


Portsmouth in the Great War is a story with a cast of thousands. They included a future archbishop and at least six brave and determined young clergymen with a talent for writing letters who volunteered as Army chaplains. There was the first naval VC of the war who was also the first submariner VC ever; a glamorous commander-in-chief, a number of dashing naval and marine officers and men - and a host of unofficial diarists and letter-writers. The wife of a Royal Academician also featured who went backwards and forwards across the Channel with hospital supplies on the Red Cross yacht Medusa until German U-boats put paid to her plans. Also in the story was the Portsmouth school girl, daughter of a local GP and Territorial Army officer, who was in Germany when war broke out and made her own, perilous way home. There were dockyard workers, and women who took their places when they went away to fight, and women who replaced men on the trams, in banks and post offices, and of course there were the men who joined the three local battalions of the Hampshire Regiment, and the ships which belonged to the Port of Portsmouth. They all took part in the greatest war the world had ever seen, and thousands of them laid down their lives in defence of this country and it's Empire - in Flanders, at Coronel, at Gallipoli and at Jutland, and in the many other theatres of war.

The book is fully illustrated and many of the images have not been published before.

The book records, through words and photographs, how each year of the war brought a change in the spirit of the local populations as the huge battles around the world, and the resulting casualties, took their toll.

The book does not claim to be an extensive history of Portsmouth during the Great War. Rather, it seeks to explore the impact of the conflict of the lives of the inhabitants, by exploring new sources of contemporary records, particularly the letters and diaries of the individuals involved. The result is an engaging and readable book which provides some remarkable insights into both the local leadership which emerged in the face of numerous challenges and the stoicism of the population....

... In writing her book, Sarah Quail has produced a sympathetic, perceptive and interesting insight into Portsmouth at war and the lives of those caught up in this great struggle. The price is well worth the attention of any reader with an interest in Portsmouth or the Great War. Recommended!

The Naval Review

As seen in The News (Portsmouth).

The News (Portsmouth)
 Sarah Quail

About Sarah Quail

Sarah Quail has lived and worked in the Portsmouth area for many years. She spent most of her career in local government and has written and contributed to a number of books and articles on different aspects of Portsmouths history. She is a member of the Church Buildings Council, a school governor, and a member of the board of management of her local arts centre.

Perfect Partner

Rails in the Road: A History of Tramways in Britain and Ireland (ePub)

There have been passenger tramways in Britain for 150 years, but it is a rollercoaster story of rise, decline and a steady return. Trams have come and gone, been loved and hated, popular and derided, considered both wildly futuristic and hopelessly outdated by politicians, planners and the public alike. Horse trams, introduced from the USA in the 1860s, were the first cheap form of public transport on city streets. Electric systems were developed in nearly every urban area from the 1890s and revolutionised town travel in the Edwardian era. A century ago, trams were at their peak, used by everyone…

By Oliver Green

Click here to buy both titles for £23.20
More titles by Sarah Quail

Other titles in Pen & Sword Military...